NHS 111

NHS 111

An NHS service being piloted to improve access to local health services for non-life-threatening (urgent) illnesses. The service is intended to be available 24/7 as a free call from land lines and mobiles, providing consistent clinical assessment at the initial point of contact and directing patients to the right person (e.g., nurse or doctor) or service (e.g., ambulance), the very first time.

NHS 111 service primary objective
• Improve public access to urgent (but not life-threatening) healthcare services;
• Increase the efficiency of the NHS by ensuring that people are able to quickly and easily access needed healthcare services;
• Increase public satisfaction and confidence in the NHS;
• Enable commissioning of more effective and productive healthcare services;
• Increase efficiency of 999 emergency ambulance service by reducing non-emergent calls.
References in periodicals archive ?
NHS 111 is available 24 hours a day, 365 days a year.
While the NHS is generally coping with winter demands, the public can continue to play their part by using NHS 111 and pharmacists for advice.
Between December 23 and January 1, the service took more than 40,000 NHS 111 calls and more than 16,000 999 calls, compared to around 28,000 NHS 111 calls and 15,000 999 calls in the same period last year.
One of the reasons for such a large increase in calls to NHS 111 has been from patients wanting a repeat prescription.
PEOPLE who need urgent but not emergency care this winter are urged to call NHS 111.
Appointments are also available at the Urgent Care Centre through NHS 111.
People are being urged to stay at home and contact their GP or NHS 111 for advice if they suspect they could be suffering from measles.
We would encourage the public to follow NHS advice which includes choosing pharmacies and NHS 111 if you need to get treatment or advice about minor ailments such as colds, coughs, sore throats, indigestion, minor cuts and bruises.
Call NHS 111 if you believe you have the early signs of sepsis or 999 if septic shock is suspected.
And the professor is highly critical of NHS 111 which is supposed to direct patients to an appropriate service.
Plus we already had the technology to do it, including instant access to online medical records, which made it different to NHS 111.
Referrals from NHS 111 to A&E increased from just under 400,000 calls in 2013 to over a million in 2014.