NCEPOD


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NCEPOD

National Confidential Enquiry into Patient Outcome and Death. A registered UK charity which performs investigations to determine if a patient’s death was inevitable (i.e., unpreventable), and makes recommendations based on the findings of the studies it undertakes. In addition to the evidence gathered in its reports, NCEPOD considers evidence already available before agreeing within the organisation which recommendations to promote.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Report co-author Dr Mark Juniper, clinical co-ordinator at NCEPOD, said: "Many people with alcohol-related liver disease have multiple admissions with this condition.
Seven criteria were used, each of which were recommendations from either the NCEPOD or Royal College documents:
In May this year, a damning 84-page report published by the National Confidential Enquiry into Patient Outcome and Death (NCEPOD) condemned the care of sickle cell patients in the UK, stressing that "many patients [do] not receive care based on best practice".
The report from the NCEPOD is due to be published by the end of the year.
The recent National Confidential Enquiry into Perioperative Deaths (NCEPOD) report on AKI in the UK suggested that 29% of patients did not have adequate assessment or documentation of the most important risk factors for AKI, and that, as in the current study, medication and comorbidity were among the most common risk factors not assessed.
For many years, the UK has been perceived to provide the best surgical patient care in Europe, but the National Confidential Enquiry into Patient Outcome and Death (NCEPOD) revealed that 60% of trauma patients in England and Wales have received suboptimal perioperative trauma care (Jansen 2010a).
Experts from the National Confidential Enquiry into Patient Outcome and Death (NCEPOD) criticised senior doctors for failing their patients by not supporting junior colleagues.
Report author and Ncepod clinical co-ordinator in surgery, Ian Martin, said: "Most patients were admitted as emergencies by very junior doctors without timely input of senior care of the elderly clinicians.
The National Confidential Enquiry into Patient Outcome and Death (NCEPOD) found failings in the way doctors cared for patients rather than in the way hospitals organised the care.
This is hard to reconcile with the NCEPOD evidence of lack of appropriate staff and beds, severely overstretched services and senior house officers spread so thinly that decisions are made by juniors.
report by the National Confidential Enquiry into Perioperative Deaths (NCEPOD) said while there had been improvements in the situation more needed to be done.