National Association of Social Workers

(redirected from NASW Code of Ethics)

National Association of Social Workers

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NASW

An international organization of professional social workers.
References in periodicals archive ?
In truth, I knew I wanted to be a social worker long before I became familiar with the NASW Code of Ethics.
The first NASW Code of Ethics, implemented in 1960--five years after the association was born and decades before the availability of digital and electronic tools for service delivery--was one page long and consisted of 14 brief, first-person proclamations concerning, for example, every social worker's duty to give precedence to professional responsibility over personal interests; respect client privacy; give appropriate service in public emergencies; and contribute knowledge, skills, and support to human welfare programs.
The NASW Press expects authors to adhere to ethical standards for scholarship as articulated in the NASW Code of Ethics and Writing for the NASW Press: Information for Authors.
NASW code of ethics (Guide to the everyday professional conduct of social workers).
Until 1979 the NASW Code of Ethics (1960) was only one page with 14 aspirational statements.
The NASW Code of Ethics (2008) uses stronger language discouraging the practice of bartering, stating:
Each chapter also contains case examples and an overview of the related standards from the NASW Code of Ethics.
I approach this state of affairs from a belief in the NASW Code of Ethics, particularly the role of advocacy that is stated there (NASW, 1999).
The NASW Code of Ethics (2008) does not include guidance on the use of technology.
It is therefore understandable that the literature does not provide much guidance regarding ethical breaches other than general guidelines in the NASW Code of Ethics (NASW, 1999; Reamer, 1995).
This new policy is based on guidelines in the NASW Code of Ethics (2000).
Although the most current NASW Code of Ethics (NASW, 2008) broadly addressed some forms of electronic communications (fax, mobile phones), it was fundamentally silent about professional practice expectations involving e-mail communication with clients.