mask

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mask

 [mask]
1. a covering for the face, as a bandage, an apparatus for administering anesthesia or oxygen, or a cloth that prevents droplets from the mouth and nose from spreading in the air.
A standard face mask. From Lammon et al., 1996.
2. to cover or conceal, as the masking of the nature of a disorder by unassociated signs or organisms.
3. in audiometry, to obscure or diminish a sound by the presence of another sound of different frequency.
mask of pregnancy popular term for melasma gravidarum.
Venturi mask see venturi mask.

mask

(mask),
1. Any of a variety of disease states or disorders that cause alteration or discoloration of the skin of the face.
2. The expressionless appearance seen in association with certain diseases; for example, Parkinson facies.
3. A facial bandage.
4. A shield designed to cover the mouth and nose for maintenance of antiseptic conditions.
5. A device designed to cover the mouth and nose for administration of inhalation anesthetics, oxygen, or other gases.

mask

(mask)
1. a covering or appliance for shading, protecting, or medicating the face.
2. to cover or conceal.
3. in audiometry, to obscure or diminish a sound by the presence of another sound of different frequency.
4. in dentistry, to camouflage metal parts of a prosthesis by covering with opaque material.

mask

(măsk)
n.
1. A covering for the nose and mouth that is used for inhaling oxygen or an anesthetic.
2. A covering worn over the nose and mouth, as by a surgeon or dentist, to prevent infection.
3. A facial bandage.
4. Any of various conditions producing alteration or discoloration of the skin of the face.
5. An expressionless appearance of the face seen in certain diseases, such as parkinsonism.
v.
To cover with a protective mask.

mask

Etymology: Fr, masque
1 v, to obscure, as in symptomatic treatment that may conceal the development of a disease.
2 v, to cover, as does a skin-toned cosmetic that may hide a pigmented nevus.
3 n, a cover worn over the nose and mouth to prevent inhalation of toxic or irritating materials, to control delivery of oxygen or anesthetic gas, or (by medical personnel) to shield a patient during aseptic procedures from pathogenic organisms normally exhaled from the respiratory tract. Surgical masks are worn by workers to help control the operating room environment during a patient procedure.
enlarge picture
Mask

mask

Audiology
verb To diminish or attenuate a sound with another.
 
Forensics
See Progressive purple mask of death.
 
Infectious control
noun A typically disposable personal protection device that covers the nose and mouth to prevent transmission of potentially infected aerosols from a patient to a healthcare worker, or vice versa.

Neurology
See Mask-like facies.
 
Psychology
noun A outward concealment of wishes or needs, often as an ego defence.

mask

Audiology verb To diminish or attenuate a sound with another Infectious control noun A usually disposable personal protection device that covers the nose to prevent transmission of potentially infected aerosols from a Pt to a health care worker–HCW or from an HCW to a Pt. See Isolation, Personal protection garment, Reverse isolation Psychology Barrier A concealment of wishes or needs, often as a ego defense.

mask

(mask)
1. Any of a variety of disease states producing alteration or discoloration of the skin of the face.
2. The expressionless appearance seen in certain diseases (e.g., Parkinson facies).
3. A facial bandage.
4. A shield designed to cover the mouth and nose for maintenance of aseptic conditions.
5. A device designed to cover the mouth and nose for administration of inhalation anesthetics, oxygen, or other gases.
See also: mission-oriented protective posture, gas mask

mask

device covering nose and mouth, facilitating administration of mouth-to-mouth assisted respiration (e.g. Leyerdahl mask), as part of infection control protocol, or to prevent inhalation of particulate matter

mask

several layers of adhesive strapping (with a central hole, matching lesion size); protects surrounding skin from effects of ointment-based caustic agents applied to e.g. verrucae; Figure 1
Figure 1: Mask: several layers of adhesive strapping with a central hole into which a caustic ointment is placed (A), overlain by a cavitied felt pad (B), strapped into place (C). This article was published in Neale's Disorders of the Foot, Lorimer, French, O'Donnell, Burrow, Wall, Copyright Elsevier, (2006).

masking

A term describing any process whereby a detectable stimulus is made difficult or impossible to detect by the presentation of a second stimulus (called the mask). The main stimulus (typically called the target) may appear at the same time as the mask (simultaneous masking); or it may precede the mask (backward masking; example: metacontrast); or it may follow the mask (forward masking; example: paracontrast).

mask

(mask)
1. Any of a variety of disease states or disorders that cause alteration or discoloration of facial skin.
2. Expressionless appearance seen in association with some diseases, e.g., Parkinson facies.
3. Facial bandage.
4. Shield designed to cover mouth and nose for maintenance of antiseptic conditions.
5. Device designed to cover mouth and nose for administration of inhalation anesthetics, oxygen, or other gases.

mask,

n 1. something that conceals from view.
n 2. a protective covering, especially for the face.
v 3. to cover up.
mask, nonbreather,
n a plastic mask worn over the oral cavity and nose in order to deliver additional oxygen to a patient who is able to breathe on his or her own. See also mask, oxygen.
mask, oxygen,
n a device used during the delivery of oxygen that fits securely over the nose and oral cavity so that oxygen may be inhaled and carbon dioxide exhaled.
mask, rubber dam,
mask, Wanscher's,
n a mask for ether anesthesia.
mask, Yankauer's,
n an open type of mask for administering ether.

mask

1. to cover or conceal, as the masking of the nature of a disorder by the presence of unassociated signs, organisms, etc.; in audiometry, to obscure or diminish a sound by the presence of another sound of different frequency.
2. an appliance for shading, protecting, or medicating the face, e.g. a surgical mask.
3. the dark shaded markings on the face of some dog and cat breeds.

Schimmelbusch mask
Venturi mask
see venturi mask.
References in periodicals archive ?
The P2 masks used have an almost identical specification as N95 masks used in the United States (19).
The proportions of HCW close contacts who appropriately wore a PPE set, rather than an N95 mask alone, for every exposure were 59% and 92%, respectively.
respirator manufacturers, warned of a shortage of N95 masks, a crucial component of the U.
06) when nurses who always wore an N95 mask (2 SARS-infected and 14 noninfected nurses) were compared with nurses who did not wear any mask (N95 or surgical mask) consistently (5 SARS-infected and 4 noninfected nurses).
Systems were established to restrict visitors, and entry guards and Medecins Sans Frontieres' advisors were tasked with distributing and monitoring personal protective equipment, such as N95 masks, gloves, gowns, and hand sanitizer.
There were no significant differences between the percentages of case-patients and controls who reported the following problems: general compliance problems, frequency of touching or adjusting the N95 mask, general problems with mask, problems with mask fit, and problems with fogging of goggles (Table 4).
She had worn a gown, gloves, and N95 mask, despite no requirement to do so on the general ward at that time.
A study of 1500 fit-tests of 500 N95 masks on 50 participants by Tongji Medical College (China), discovered that over 90% failed the fit-test due to poor face seal.
The kits each contain gloves, hand sanitizer, N95 masks, tissues, Sani-Hands packettes and a thermometer.
Non-essential employees at Malaysian bank CIMB were allowed to work from home and staff were given N95 masks, which block out 95 percent of airborne particles larger than 0.
Research shows that N95 masks, which you can get at hardware stores, block 95 percent of fine particles, whereas cloth masks are only minimally effective by keeping out a mere 28 percent.