mask

(redirected from N95 mask)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

mask

 [mask]
1. a covering for the face, as a bandage, an apparatus for administering anesthesia or oxygen, or a cloth that prevents droplets from the mouth and nose from spreading in the air.
A standard face mask. From Lammon et al., 1996.
2. to cover or conceal, as the masking of the nature of a disorder by unassociated signs or organisms.
3. in audiometry, to obscure or diminish a sound by the presence of another sound of different frequency.
mask of pregnancy popular term for melasma gravidarum.
Venturi mask see venturi mask.

mask

(mask),
1. Any of a variety of disease states or disorders that cause alteration or discoloration of the skin of the face.
2. The expressionless appearance seen in association with certain diseases; for example, Parkinson facies.
3. A facial bandage.
4. A shield designed to cover the mouth and nose for maintenance of antiseptic conditions.
5. A device designed to cover the mouth and nose for administration of inhalation anesthetics, oxygen, or other gases.

mask

(măsk)
n.
1. A covering for the nose and mouth that is used for inhaling oxygen or an anesthetic.
2. A covering worn over the nose and mouth, as by a surgeon or dentist, to prevent infection.
3. A facial bandage.
4. Any of various conditions producing alteration or discoloration of the skin of the face.
5. An expressionless appearance of the face seen in certain diseases, such as parkinsonism.
v.
To cover with a protective mask.

mask

Audiology
verb To diminish or attenuate a sound with another.
 
Forensics
See Progressive purple mask of death.
 
Infectious control
noun A typically disposable personal protection device that covers the nose and mouth to prevent transmission of potentially infected aerosols from a patient to a healthcare worker, or vice versa.

Neurology
See Mask-like facies.
 
Psychology
noun A outward concealment of wishes or needs, often as an ego defence.

mask

Audiology verb To diminish or attenuate a sound with another Infectious control noun A usually disposable personal protection device that covers the nose to prevent transmission of potentially infected aerosols from a Pt to a health care worker–HCW or from an HCW to a Pt. See Isolation, Personal protection garment, Reverse isolation Psychology Barrier A concealment of wishes or needs, often as a ego defense.

mask

(mask)
1. Any of a variety of disease states producing alteration or discoloration of the skin of the face.
2. The expressionless appearance seen in certain diseases (e.g., Parkinson facies).
3. A facial bandage.
4. A shield designed to cover the mouth and nose for maintenance of aseptic conditions.
5. A device designed to cover the mouth and nose for administration of inhalation anesthetics, oxygen, or other gases.
See also: mission-oriented protective posture, gas mask

masking

A term describing any process whereby a detectable stimulus is made difficult or impossible to detect by the presentation of a second stimulus (called the mask). The main stimulus (typically called the target) may appear at the same time as the mask (simultaneous masking); or it may precede the mask (backward masking; example: metacontrast); or it may follow the mask (forward masking; example: paracontrast).

mask

(mask)
1. Any of a variety of disease states or disorders that cause alteration or discoloration of facial skin.
2. Expressionless appearance seen in association with some diseases, e.g., Parkinson facies.
3. Facial bandage.
4. Shield designed to cover mouth and nose for maintenance of antiseptic conditions.
5. Device designed to cover mouth and nose for administration of inhalation anesthetics, oxygen, or other gases.
References in periodicals archive ?
The N95 masks were the clear winner, particularly when it came to filtering the ultrafine particles, which are of greatest concern because they remain suspended in air longer and penetrate deeper into the respiratory tract than larger particles.
Overall, 20-25 PPE sets were required per patient, with variable HCW compliance for wearing these items (93% N95 masks, 77% gowns, 83% gloves, and 73% eye protection).
One report from Hong Kong has suggested that surgical and N95 masks are protective (9), but few data exist to support the recommendations.
Percentages with perceived inadequacy of personal protection equipment supply and breakthrough SARS infection among hospital workers (a) Controls Case- (n = 143) patients (n =72) Type of personal n % n % protection equipment Surgical mask 1 0.7 14 19.4 N95 mask 13 9.1 20 27.8 Gown 7 4.9 19 26.4 Gloves 2 1.4 12 16.7 Goggles 5 3.5 22 30.6 Cap 4 2.8 21 29.2 Any one of above as 20 14.0 32 44.4 inadequate (b) No.
The second physician (case-patient 11) may have become infected because the N95 mask was poorly fitting.
" We are promoting a holistic solution to the rising air pollution by using air purifiers, N95 masks, air cleaning plants, HEPA filters and activated carbon filters.
A teaching session was designed and delivered to the EC staff on correct use of N95 masks. A poster with key information on it was also designed and printed in the EC handbook and made available in the EC as a reminder.
The transmission of CCHFV could have resulted from indirect contact with contaminated devices, such as the head mirror; the improper removal of gowns, masks, gloves; inadequate hand hygiene; or failure to use N95 masks during aerosolizing procedures.
The kits each contain gloves, hand sanitizer, N95 masks, tissues, Sani-Hands packettes and a thermometer.
Non-essential employees at Malaysian bank CIMB were allowed to work from home and staff were given N95 masks, which block out 95 percent of airborne particles larger than 0.3 microns, said the lender's regional economist Song Seng Wun.
Research shows that N95 masks, which you can get at hardware stores, block 95 percent of fine particles, whereas cloth masks are only minimally effective by keeping out a mere 28 percent.
(5) Inadequate use of preventative measures like N95 masks, poor ventilation at the work place, exposure during procedures like sputum induction and bronchoscopy are other risk factors.