mask

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mask

 [mask]
1. a covering for the face, as a bandage, an apparatus for administering anesthesia or oxygen, or a cloth that prevents droplets from the mouth and nose from spreading in the air.
A standard face mask. From Lammon et al., 1996.
2. to cover or conceal, as the masking of the nature of a disorder by unassociated signs or organisms.
3. in audiometry, to obscure or diminish a sound by the presence of another sound of different frequency.
mask of pregnancy popular term for melasma gravidarum.
Venturi mask see venturi mask.

mask

(mask),
1. Any of a variety of disease states or disorders that cause alteration or discoloration of the skin of the face.
2. The expressionless appearance seen in association with certain diseases; for example, Parkinson facies.
3. A facial bandage.
4. A shield designed to cover the mouth and nose for maintenance of antiseptic conditions.
5. A device designed to cover the mouth and nose for administration of inhalation anesthetics, oxygen, or other gases.

mask

(mask)
1. a covering or appliance for shading, protecting, or medicating the face.
2. to cover or conceal.
3. in audiometry, to obscure or diminish a sound by the presence of another sound of different frequency.
4. in dentistry, to camouflage metal parts of a prosthesis by covering with opaque material.

mask

(măsk)
n.
1. A covering for the nose and mouth that is used for inhaling oxygen or an anesthetic.
2. A covering worn over the nose and mouth, as by a surgeon or dentist, to prevent infection.
3. A facial bandage.
4. Any of various conditions producing alteration or discoloration of the skin of the face.
5. An expressionless appearance of the face seen in certain diseases, such as parkinsonism.
v.
To cover with a protective mask.

mask

Etymology: Fr, masque
1 v, to obscure, as in symptomatic treatment that may conceal the development of a disease.
2 v, to cover, as does a skin-toned cosmetic that may hide a pigmented nevus.
3 n, a cover worn over the nose and mouth to prevent inhalation of toxic or irritating materials, to control delivery of oxygen or anesthetic gas, or (by medical personnel) to shield a patient during aseptic procedures from pathogenic organisms normally exhaled from the respiratory tract. Surgical masks are worn by workers to help control the operating room environment during a patient procedure.
enlarge picture
Mask

mask

Audiology
verb To diminish or attenuate a sound with another.
 
Forensics
See Progressive purple mask of death.
 
Infectious control
noun A typically disposable personal protection device that covers the nose and mouth to prevent transmission of potentially infected aerosols from a patient to a healthcare worker, or vice versa.

Neurology
See Mask-like facies.
 
Psychology
noun A outward concealment of wishes or needs, often as an ego defence.

mask

Audiology verb To diminish or attenuate a sound with another Infectious control noun A usually disposable personal protection device that covers the nose to prevent transmission of potentially infected aerosols from a Pt to a health care worker–HCW or from an HCW to a Pt. See Isolation, Personal protection garment, Reverse isolation Psychology Barrier A concealment of wishes or needs, often as a ego defense.

mask

(mask)
1. Any of a variety of disease states producing alteration or discoloration of the skin of the face.
2. The expressionless appearance seen in certain diseases (e.g., Parkinson facies).
3. A facial bandage.
4. A shield designed to cover the mouth and nose for maintenance of aseptic conditions.
5. A device designed to cover the mouth and nose for administration of inhalation anesthetics, oxygen, or other gases.
See also: mission-oriented protective posture, gas mask

mask

device covering nose and mouth, facilitating administration of mouth-to-mouth assisted respiration (e.g. Leyerdahl mask), as part of infection control protocol, or to prevent inhalation of particulate matter

mask

several layers of adhesive strapping (with a central hole, matching lesion size); protects surrounding skin from effects of ointment-based caustic agents applied to e.g. verrucae; Figure 1
Figure 1: Mask: several layers of adhesive strapping with a central hole into which a caustic ointment is placed (A), overlain by a cavitied felt pad (B), strapped into place (C). This article was published in Neale's Disorders of the Foot, Lorimer, French, O'Donnell, Burrow, Wall, Copyright Elsevier, (2006).

masking

A term describing any process whereby a detectable stimulus is made difficult or impossible to detect by the presentation of a second stimulus (called the mask). The main stimulus (typically called the target) may appear at the same time as the mask (simultaneous masking); or it may precede the mask (backward masking; example: metacontrast); or it may follow the mask (forward masking; example: paracontrast).

mask

(mask)
1. Any of a variety of disease states or disorders that cause alteration or discoloration of facial skin.
2. Expressionless appearance seen in association with some diseases, e.g., Parkinson facies.
3. Facial bandage.
4. Shield designed to cover mouth and nose for maintenance of antiseptic conditions.
5. Device designed to cover mouth and nose for administration of inhalation anesthetics, oxygen, or other gases.

mask,

n 1. something that conceals from view.
n 2. a protective covering, especially for the face.
v 3. to cover up.
mask, nonbreather,
n a plastic mask worn over the oral cavity and nose in order to deliver additional oxygen to a patient who is able to breathe on his or her own. See also mask, oxygen.
mask, oxygen,
n a device used during the delivery of oxygen that fits securely over the nose and oral cavity so that oxygen may be inhaled and carbon dioxide exhaled.
mask, rubber dam,
mask, Wanscher's,
n a mask for ether anesthesia.
mask, Yankauer's,
n an open type of mask for administering ether.

mask

1. to cover or conceal, as the masking of the nature of a disorder by the presence of unassociated signs, organisms, etc.; in audiometry, to obscure or diminish a sound by the presence of another sound of different frequency.
2. an appliance for shading, protecting, or medicating the face, e.g. a surgical mask.
3. the dark shaded markings on the face of some dog and cat breeds.

Schimmelbusch mask
Venturi mask
see venturi mask.
References in periodicals archive ?
WHO Recommendations for HCW barrier precautions, dependent on type of exposure * ([dagger]) HCW activity Recommended PPE set Close contact (<1 m) with Gloves, gown, N95 mask (or equivalent potential API-infected patient particulate respirator), eye within or outside of the protection isolation room or area Cleaning Gloves, either gown or apron Patient transport within Gown, gloves healthcare facilities Specimen transport and Not defined except to use "safe processing handling practices"; interpreted as use of gloves (minimum) and gown if opening specimen bag.
c) Consistent use of the N95 mask versus consistent use of a surgical mask.
Our initial infection-control policy first required staff working in the emergency department, ICU, and isolation rooms to wear full personal protection equipment (PPE), which included an N95 mask, disposable gloves, and long-sleeve gowns.
Pre employment screening chest X-ray for HCWs and annual TST followed by IGRA for those who are positive, installation of ultraviolet lights on consultation and X-ray rooms as well as the use of N95 masks are important measures for minimizing the nosocomial transmission of TB and should be strengthened in Oman.
Six momarsa for the supply of (a) antibiotics, (b) automatic syringes with related accessories and parts, (c) veterinary tools, (d) plastic syringes, latex gloves (multi - use) among other tools, (e) a detergent comprising potassium perox mono sulfate and (f) N95 masks.
says his hospital had difficulty maintaining an adequate supply of N95 masks during the H1N1 outbreak.
N95 masks were not reported as being used routinely.
One is a shortage of N95 masks, a required piece of personal protective equipment when caring for hospitalized patients with pandemic influenza.
In a real-life situation rather than laboratory testing, routine surgical masks were found to be as effective in containing the influenza virus as N95 masks made from finer material No influenza virus droplets were detected by Melbourne's Austin Hospital researchers when people who wore either of the masks coughed, but influenza was detected when masks were not worn.
Those unfortunate souls who are allergic to perfumes and other chemical aromatics will provide a continuing market for the N95 masks.
A total of 60 goggles, and 300 N95 masks were also provided to the affected individuals.