nitrous oxide

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nitrous

 [ni´trus]
pertaining to or containing nitrogen in its lowest valence.
nitrous oxide a colorless, odorless gas that is a weak inhalational anesthetic, usually used in combination with a potent halogenated inhalational anesthetic to produce general anesthesia or briefly for dental surgery. Its use as a sole agent requires high concentrations that may cause hypoxia. abuse poses the risk of anoxic death from asphyxia. Popularly known as laughing gas.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

ni·trous ox·ide

(nī'trŭs oks'īd),
N2O; a nonflammable, nonexplosive gas that will support combustion; widely used as a rapidly acting, rapidly reversible, nondepressant, and nontoxic inhalation analgesic to supplement other anesthetics and analgesics; its anesthetic potency alone at normal atmospheric pressure is inadequate to provide surgical anesthesia.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

nitrous oxide

n.
A colorless, sweet-tasting gas, N2O, used as a mild anesthetic in dentistry and surgery.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

nitrous oxide

NO2 Anesthesiology The most commonly used inhalation anesthetic Pharmacologic effects Analgesia, delirium, loss of motor control, elation, excitement Used for Pre-operative, short minor surgery
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

ni·trous ox·ide

(nī'trŭs ok'sīd)
A nonflammable, nonexplosive gas that will support combustion; widely used as a rapidly acting, rapidly reversible, nondepressant, and nontoxic inhalation analgesic to supplement other anesthetics and analgesics; its anesthetic potency is inadequate to provide surgical anesthesia.
Synonym(s): laughing gas.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

nitrous oxide

A weak anaesthetic and painkilling (analgesic) gas widely used as a vehicle for more potent anaesthetic agents in the maintenance of general anaesthesia. Also known as ‘laughing gas’. The drug is on the WHO official list.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

Nitrous oxide

A colorless, sweet-smelling gas used by dentists for mild anesthesia. It is sometimes called laughing gas because it makes some patients feel giddy or silly.
Mentioned in: Tooth Extraction
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

ni·trous ox·ide

(nī'trŭs ok'sīd)
Nonflammable, nonexplosive gas that will support combustion; widely used as a quick acting, reversible, nondepressant, and nontoxic inhalation analgesic to supplement other anesthetics and analgesics.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
100 kg N2O ha -1 - N2 10.42###10.69###10.56###32.20###30.03###31.12###2.07###2.02###2.05
4) Contributing to the prevention of global warming: The contribution of N2O to global warming is 310 times greater than that of CO2.
Data were analyzed using SPSS 16.0 for the one-way and two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) for grain yield, yield components, seasonal CH4 and N2O emissions, GWP and yield-scaled GWP.
Nitrous oxide (N2O) is one of the major greenhouse gases mainly produced by the application of N fertilizers for the production of different crops.
For the past 400,000 years, changes in atmospheric N2O appear to have roughly paralleled changes in carbon dioxide CO2 and have had modest impacts on climate, but this may change.
This CDM(1) project, which reduces N2O in the production process of caprolactam(2) (a raw material used to make nylon 6(3)) is being undertaken at a plant of Thai Caprolactam Public Co., Ltd.
Three important Green House Gases (GHGs) CO2 CH4 and N2O are emitted by agricultural systems which contribute significantly to global warming.
The NGO BeyondHFCs welcomes the adoption, on 21 January, of a decision that bans the use of pollution allowances obtained in exchange for investments in projects to destroy trifluoromethane (HFC-23) and nitrous oxide (N2O).
The research adds to the growing debate over how best to estimate the increase in human induced nitrous oxide (N2O) levels since the industrial revolution.
Following protracted discussions, developed countries pledged to reduce their combined emissions of six greenhouse gases by 5% within five years: carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), nitrous oxide (N2O), hydrofluorocarbons (HFC), perfluorohydrocarbons (PFC) and sulphur hexaflouride (SF6).