Neisseria meningitidis

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Neis·se·ri·a me·nin·gi·'ti·dis

a bacterial species found in the nasopharynx of humans but not in other animals; the causative agent of meningococcal meningitis and meningicoccemia; virulent organisms are strongly gram negative and occur singly or in pairs; in the latter case the cocci are elongated and are arranged with long axes parallel and facing sides kidney shaped; groups characterized by serologically specific capsular polysaccharides are designated by capital letters (the main serogroups being A, B, C, and D).
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

Neisseria meningitidis

Meningococcus Infectious disease A gram-positive coccus which is part of the normal nasopharyngeal flora; it is one of the most common causes of meningitis in the US
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Neis·se·ri·a me·nin·gi·ti·dis

(nī-sēr'ē-ă men-in-jit'i-dis)
A species found in the nasopharynx; the causative agent of meningococcal meningitis. Virulent organisms are strongly gram-negative and occur singly or in pairs; in the latter case the cocci are elongated and are arranged with long axes parallel and facing sides kidney shaped. Groups characterized by serologically specific capsular polysaccharides are designated by capital letters (the main serogroups being A, B, C, and D).
Synonym(s): meningococcus.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

Neisser,

Albert Ludwig S., German physician, 1855-1916.
Neisseria catarrhalis
Neisseria flavescens
Neisseria gonorrhoeae - a species that causes gonorrhea in humans. Synonym(s): Neisser coccus
Neisseria lactamica
Neisseria meningitidis
Neisseria sicca
Neisseria subflava
Neisseria - a genus of aerobic to facultatively anaerobic bacteria (family Neisseriaceae) that are parasites of animals.
Neisseria mucosa
Neisser coccus - Synonym(s): Neisseria gonorrhoeae
Neisser diplococcus
Neisser syringe - a urethral syringe used in treatment of gonococcal urethritis.
Medical Eponyms © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
When N. meningitidis was identified on day 4 of life, the infant was hospitalized and underwent a sepsis workup that included blood and cerebrospinal fluid cultures (both showed negative results).
All N. meningitidis isolates were requested for serogroup typing at the Georgia Public Health Laboratory as part of Active Bacterial Core surveillance.
It is important to get immunized considering that there is a vaccine that protects against four groups of N. meningitidis: group A, group C, group Y and group W-135.
N. meningitidis is cultured for 18-24 hours and grows best in a capnophilic environment that requires 35-37[degrees]C incubation with 5% C[O.sub.2].
Also, culture-based detection of N. meningitidis in the sputum sample could be misleading because N.
N. meningitidis occurs more often as epidemics with its largest burden found in sub-Saharan Africa and less so in developed countries [4].
In this perspective, this cross-sectional study was conducted to assess the prevalence of N. meningitidis carriage and associated factors in among children and adolescents aged 1-24 years.
Also, reports that include epidemiology data of septic arthritis in immunodeficiency patients do not mention N. meningitidis [6, 7].
Invasive meningococcal disease (IMD) is a life-threatening condition caused by the bacterium Neisseria meningitidis (N. meningitidis), an encapsulated gram-negative diplococcus that is a pathogen exclusive to humans.
Before these approvals, existing approved meningococcal vaccines in the United States covered only four of the five main serogroups of N. meningitidis bacteria that cause meningococcal disease: A, C, Y and W.
Before the two vaccines were approved, commercially available FDA-approved meningococcal vaccines covered four of the five main serogroups of N. meningitidis bacteria that cause meningococcal disease (A, C, Y, and W).