myth

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Related to Myths: Greek myths, Urban myths
A generic term for popular beliefs in medicine which have proven over time to be invalid, which are maintained in medical culture because of inertia

myth

(mith) [Gr. mythos, story]
1. A narrative whose plot, characters, and themes are well known culturally or globally. It may have a variety of cultural meanings and may become an emblem of psychological, religious, or social truth. Alternatively, it may be used to summon inspiration or courage or provide a source of fear or wonder.
2. A falsehood; an unscientific proposition, often one that is demonstrably untrue.
Synonym: urban legend
References in periodicals archive ?
What helps keep the myth alive is institutional Christianity, as it provides a discipline of official, generally accepted, central beliefs (dogmas), a larger body of supporting beliefs (traditions, doctrines, more or less official teachings), and a system of rituals and texts to help adherents enter imaginatively (by mimesis of Jesus and the saints) into the dominant myths of Christianity.
Myth #2 Limits of Liability Identified In The Certificate Will Be Sufficient And Available to Cover Loss.
Such exaggerations aside, however, Gerwarth's study is a thorough examination of how historical myths are used in social and political discourse, and it is a worthy addition to our understanding of Weimar politics.
Myths And Legends Of The Second World War by James Hayward is an impressive collection of lore and lies, folk stories and propaganda generated misinformation drawn from every theatre of World War II.
From where did southern myths come, and how were, how are they exacerbated?
HANUKKAH is popularized by a rabbinic myth; a myth that embodies a story told of a container of oil miraculously lasting seven days beyond its expected use.
The thesis of this book is that myths create history.
To be successful, mills must break the myths that exist in their organizations.
In order to survive as cultures, people develop myths to overcome what is conflictive.
2) "Symbolic violence" against women (292-293) was justified on the basis of myths camouflaged as natural truths, making it easier to conceal the real violence of the biological determinism that forcibly enclosed women's lives.
His latest book, Evolution, Creationism, and Other Modern Myths, offers a third way of thinking that "examines the rich verbal traditions handed down from non-Western culture over thousands of years, which speak of worlds prior to the one we now inhabit.
She interweaves early modern historical narratives, political discourses, and myths in her trenchant literary analyses of the representations of colonization in Stuart drama.