myoclonic seizure


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seizure

 [se´zhur]
1. the sudden attack or recurrence of a disease.
2. a convulsion or attack of epilepsy.
absence seizure the seizure seen in petit mal epilepsy, marked by a momentary break in the stream of thought and activity, accompanied by a symmetrical spike and wave at 3 cycles per second on the electroencephalogram. Called also petit malseizure. See epilepsy.
atonic seizure an absence seizure characterized by sudden loss of muscle tone.
complex partial seizure see partial seizure.
febrile seizure febrile convulsion.
focal seizure partial seizure.
focal motor seizure a simple partial seizure consisting of clonus or spasm of a muscle or muscle group, occurring either singly or in a continuous repetitive series.
generalized tonic-clonic seizure (grand mal seizure) the seizure seen in grand mal epilepsy, marked by loss of consciousness and generalized tonic convulsions followed by clonic convulsions. See epilepsy.
jackknife s's infantile spasms.
myoclonic seizure one characterized by a brief episode of myoclonus.
partial seizure any seizure due to a lesion in a specific, known area of the cerebral cortex; symptoms vary with different lesion locations. A simple partial seizure is the most localized type, with a discharge that is predominantly one-sided or presents localized features without loss of consciousness. A complex partial seizure is associated with disease of the temporal lobe and characterized by varying degrees of impairment of consciousness. See epilepsy.
petit mal seizure absence seizure.
reflex seizure (sensory seizure) an epileptic seizure in response to a sensory stimulus, which may be tactile, visual, auditory, or musical.
simple partial seizure see partial seizure.
tonic-clonic seizure see generalized tonic-clonic seizure.

my·o·clon·ic sei·zure

a seizure characterized by sudden, brief (200-msec) contractions of muscle fibers, muscles, or groups of muscles of variable topography (axial, proximal, or distal limb).

myoclonic seizure

a seizure characterized by a brief episode of myoclonus (brief lightning-like jerks), with immediate recovery and often without loss of consciousness.

my·o·clon·ic sei·zure

(mīō-klonik sēzhŭr)
Seizure characterized by sudden, brief (200-msec) contractions of muscle fibers, muscles, or groups of muscles.
References in periodicals archive ?
As it is shown in Table 4, naloxone dose-dependently reversed the anticonvulsant activity of thymoquinone so that the mice pretreated with naloxone, exhibited the same myoclonic seizure profile as the control group.
However, between age 1 and 4 years, the child develops febrile and afebrile seizures of multiple types, including generalized tonic-clonic, complex partial, tonic/atonic, and myoclonic seizures.
Mean age at the onset of myoclonic seizures GTCS and absence seizures was 13.
Used for myoclonic seizures, photosensitive seizures, status epilepticus and neonatal seizures
Levetiracetam Injection is indicated in adult patients (>=16 years of age), as adjunctive therapy, when oral administration is temporarily not feasible for treatment of partial onset seizures, myoclonic seizures in those with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy, or primary generalized tonic-clonic seizures in those with idiopathic generalized epilepsy, said the company.
The PTZ-induced clonic seizure paradigm represents an animal model of myoclonic seizures and is very sensitive to changes in seizure susceptibility [19].
That brings us back to the drawing board which in this case led the team to rethink Levetiracetam, a novel new antiepileptic that has been used as monotherapy for partial seizures and adjunctive therapy for generalized tonic clonic and myoclonic seizures.
Intractable epilepsy in children under the age of 2 is often associated with later intellectual disability (ID); seizure types with the greatest probability of ID are myoclonic seizures
He has had myoclonic seizures, where part of his body jerks; absence seizures, where he stares into space; and tonic-clonic seizures, which is what we describe as the 'big shaky' ones.
22) Recent research has suggested that bovine glandulars may be helpful for thyroid support, (23) myoclonic seizures, (24) and even CHARGE syndrome.
Myoclonic seizures usually manifest as sudden, brief head drops and arm flexion, and may occur hundreds of times per day (Blumstein & Friedman, 2007).