myoclonus

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Related to Myoclonic jerk: Hypnic jerk

myoclonus

 [mi″o-klo´nus]
shocklike contractions of part of a muscle, an entire muscle, or a group of muscles; usually a manifestation of a convulsive disorder. adj., adj myoclon´ic.
A single myoclonic arm or leg jerk is normal when the person is falling asleep. Myoclonic jerks are severe with grand mal seizures. From Jarvis, 1996.
palatal myoclonus a condition characterized by a rapid rhythmic movement of one or both sides of the palate.

my·oc·lo·nus

(mī-ok'lō-nŭs, mī-ō-klo'nŭs),
One or a series of shocklike contractions of a group of muscles, of variable regularity, synchrony, and symmetry, generally due to a central nervous system lesion.
[myo- + G. klonos, tumult]

myoclonus

(mī-ŏk′lə-nəs)
n.
A sudden irregular twitching of muscles or parts of muscles, occurring in various brain disorders.

my′o·clon′ic (mī′ə-klŏn′ĭk) adj.

myoclonus

Lightning movement Neurology A rapid involuntary nonrhythmic spasm that can occur spontaneously at rest, in response to sensory stimulation, or with voluntary movements; myoclonias are symptoms and not, per se, diseases a sui generis Management Clonazepam, valproic acid. See Baltic myoclonus, Posthypoxic ischemic myoclonus, Sleep-related myoclonus.
Myoclonus types
Essential myoclonus Idiopathic/non-progressive, eg restless legs syndrome
Physiologic myoclonus Associated with sleep jerks and hiccups
Epileptic myoclonus Associated with epilepsy and
Symptomatic myoclonus Associated with encephalopathy, spinocerebellar degeneration, metabolic, toxic, or viral encephalopathy or trauma  

my·oc·lo·nus

(mī'ok'lŏ-nŭs)
One or a series of shocklike contractions of a group of muscles, of variable regularity, synchrony, and symmetry, generally due to a central nervous system lesion.
[myo- + G. klonos, tumult]

myoclonus

A sudden, brief, involuntary muscle contraction usually causing a jerk of a limb. This occurs most commonly as a normal phenomenon in people half asleep but myoclonic contractions are a feature of EPILEPSY and of many other brain diseases.

Myoclonus

Involuntary contractions of a muscle or group of muscles.
Mentioned in: Anoxia

my·oc·lo·nus

(mī'ok'lŏ-nŭs)
One or a series of shocklike contractions of a group of muscles, of variable regularity, synchrony, and symmetry.
[myo- + G. klonos, tumult]
References in periodicals archive ?
(14): stage 0, no behavioral change; stage 1, hypoactivity and immobility; stage 2, two or more isolated, myoclonic jerks; stage 3, generalized clonic convulsions with preservation of righting reflex; and stage 4, generalized clonic or tonic-clonic convulsions with loss of righting reflex.
Tuberous sclerosis classically presents during infancy with seizures or myoclonic jerks. it is generally believed that the earlier the seizures occur, the more severe the syndrome will be.[2] It is estimated that only one third of afflicted individuals have normal intelligence.[3] Seizures can appear as early as 1 week of age; in one series only 8% of those children with seizure onset before 1 year of age had normal intelligence.[3]
The most common type of epileptic spasm was generalized tonic clonic along with myoclonic jerks (38.7%) followed by flexor spasms (30.5%) and mixed type (28%).
In our case, there was a temporal correlation between the stressor and myoclonic jerks each time, which were getting better with anxiolytics, even without any antiepileptic.
Signal changes in basal ganglia (Pattern 1) are seen in all the 7 cases of Wilson's disease, 5 cases of chorea, 3 cases of atypical parkinsonism, 2 cases of dystonia and Parkinson's disease, 1 case of myoclonic jerks. Signal changes in thalamus (Pattern 2) are seen in 5 cases of Wilson's and 1 case of chorea and myoclonic jerks.
[10] Our patient had myoclonic jerks that disappeared after 2 months of treatment with vitamin [B.sub.12].
In order to reach this stage, the rats had previously undergone myoclonic jerks. The time for myoclonic jerks to first appear (MjAT), the time for a GTCS to appear (GTCSAT), and the back to normal recovery time (RT) were recorded.
* Dosing solely at night often effective for myoclonic jerks (and may be first choice)
PTZ initially produced myoclonic jerks, followed by facial and forelimb clonus, which then became sustained and led to generalized tonic-clonic jerking (loss of righting reflex and tonic forlimb flexion/extension, followed by whole body clonus).
Disease Clinical Disease Creutzfeldt- Myoclonic jerks, Jakob disease (CJD) ataxia, speech and visual loss, parses and dementia.