myelocyte

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myelocyte

 [mi´ĕ-lo-sīt″]
1. a precursor in the granulocytic series intermediate between a promyelocyte and a metamyelocyte, normally occurring only in the bone marrow. In this stage, differentiation into specific cytoplasmic granules has begun.
2. any cell of the gray matter of the nervous system. adj., adj myelocyt´ic.

my·e·lo·cyte

(mī'ĕ-lō-sīt),
1. A young cell of the granulocytic series, occurring normally in bone marrow, but not in circulating blood (except in certain diseases). When stained with the usual dyes, the cytoplasm is distinctly basophilic and relatively more abundant than in myeloblasts or promyelocytes, even though myelocyte's are smaller cells; numerous cytoplasmic granules (that is, neutrophilic, eosinophilic, or basophilic) are present in the more mature forms of myelocyte's, and the first two types are peroxidase positive. The nuclear chromatin is coarser than that observed in myeloblasts, but it is relatively faintly stained and lacks a well-defined membrane; the nucleus is fairly regular in contour (that is, not indented), and seems to be "buried" beneath the numerous cytoplasmic granules.
2. A nerve cell of the gray matter of the brain or spinal cord. Synonym(s): medullocell
[myelo- + G. kytos, cell]

myelocyte

/my·elo·cyte/ (mi´ĕ-lo-sīt″) a precursor in the granulocyte series, being a cell intermediate in development between a promyelocyte and a metamyelocyte.myelocyt´ic

myelocyte

(mī′ə-lə-sīt′)
n.
A large cell of the bone marrow that is a precursor of the mature granulocyte of the blood.

my′e·lo·cyt′ic (-sĭt′ĭk) adj.

myelocyte

[mī′əlōsīt′]
Etymology: Gk, myelos + kytos, cell
the third of the maturation stages of the granulocytic leukocytes normally found in the bone marrow. Granules are visible in the cytoplasm. The nuclear material of the myelocyte is denser than that of the myeloblast. Myelocytes appear on peripheral blood films in chronic myelogenous leukemia or in severe infection. Compare myeloblast. myelocytic, adj.
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Myelocyte

myelocyte

A round to oval, variably sized (10–18 µm in diameter) cell found in the bone marrow and peripheral circulation, which is generally smaller than a promyelocyte, and has an occasionally flattened or indented, central or eccentric nucleus generally lacking a nucleolus with variable chromatin clumping. The N:C ratio is 2:1 to 1:1. The cytoplasm is abundant, stains bluish-pink, light pink, or is colourless; it contains some reddish-purple azurophilic (primary) granules and/or numerous fine, lilac, specific (secondary) granules.

my·e·lo·cyte

(mī'ĕ-lō-sīt)
1. A young cell of the granulocytic series, occurring normally in bone marrow, but not in circulating blood. When stained, the cytoplasm is distinctly basophilic and more abundant than in myeloblasts or promyelocytes; numerous cytoplasmic granules are present in the more mature forms. The nucleus is regular in contour, i.e., not indented, and seems to be "buried" beneath the numerous cytoplasmic granules.
2. A nerve cell of the gray matter of the brain or spinal cord.
[myelo- + G. kytos, cell]

myelocyte

An immature white blood cell normally found in the bone marrow.

my·e·lo·cyte

(mī'ĕ-lō-sīt)
1. A young cell of the granulocytic series, occurring normally in bone marrow, but not in circulating blood.
2. A nerve cell of the gray matter of the brain or spinal cord.
[myelo- + G. kytos, cell]

myelocyte

1. a precursor in the granulocytic series intermediate between a promyelocyte and a metamyelocyte, normally occurring only in the bone marrow. In this stage, differentiation into specific cytoplasmic granules has begun.
2. any cell of the gray matter of the nervous system.
References in periodicals archive ?
Soluble triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells 1: A biomarker for bacterial meningitis.
High-power magnification of the specimen in Figure 2 shows many reactive plasma cells, intermixed with the neoplastic myeloid cells.
In addition, this miRNA has been shown to negatively regulate p63 in CD32 cells (a murine myeloid cell line) leading to increased proliferation of these cells (22).
I alpha, 25-d i hydroxyvitamin D(3)-induced myeloid cell differentiation is regulated by a vitamin D receptor-phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase signaling complex.
The heme enzyme myeloperoxidase (MPO), which is synthesized and secreted by neutrophils, monocytes, and other myeloid cells, is an important source of oxidants.
The peripheral blood smear presents with a leukoerythroblastic picture, which includes teardrop RBCs, poikilocytosis, anisocytosis, nucleated red blood cells, and immature myeloid cells.
Most notably, the mice treated with glycyrrhizin closely resembled the normal mice in that they also had the antimicrobial peptides and no immature myeloid cells.
On clinical presentation, it is in an indolent chronic or a stable phase with excessive numbers of myeloid cells in both the peripheral blood and bone marrow.
In this issue, Tintinger and colleagues try to correlate a new marker of inflammation, soluble triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells (s-TREM-1) in bronchial secretions, with a clinical score for nosocomial pneumonia.
The triggering receptors expressed on myeloid cells (TREM) are a family of activating receptors that participate in diverse cell processes, including inflammation, bone homeostasis, neurological development and coagulation.
In CML, too many myeloid cells (one of the main types of white blood cells) are produced.
In contrast, Brown says chronic leukemias are associated with more mature lymphoid or myeloid cells.