Mycobacterium vaccae


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Mycobacterium vaccae

a rapidly growing scotochromogenic, nonpathogenic species that is distributed widely in nature.

My·co·bac·te·ri·um vac·cae

(mī'kō-bak-tēr'ē-ŭm vak'sē)
A rapidly growing scotochromogenic, nonpathogenic bacterial species that is distributed widely in nature.
References in periodicals archive ?
And now scientists have discovered that Mycobacterium vaccae - the microbes that live in the soil - act like Prozac, stimulating serotonin in the brain, it turns out that getting your hands dirty could be hugely beneficial.
A bacterium called Mycobacterium vaccae could protect against stress and anxiety.
It's called Mycobacterium vaccae, and studies show it boosts the immune system and activates serotonin-producing neurons in the same way prescription drugs do.
Exposure to the soil bacteria Mycobacterium vaccae can improve our immune health and emotional health by acting as a natural antidepressant that increases the release and metabolism of serotonin in parts of the brain that control cognitive function.
Even contact with soil could be a health-booster "There's a harmless bacteria, Mycobacterium vaccae, normally found in dirt, which stimulates the immune system and has also been found to boost the production of serotonin, the feel-good brain chemical," says Lane.
EVEN CONTACT WITH SOIL COULD BE A HEALTH-BOOSTER Mark said: "There's a harmless bacteria, Mycobacterium vaccae, normally found in dirt, which stimulates the immune system and has also been found to boost the production of serotonin, the feel-good brain chemical.
Originally presented at the 110th General Meeting of the American Society for Microbiology in San Diego about six years ago, professors from the Sage Colleges presented a paper titled, "Effect of Mycobacterium vaccae on Learning."
That said, these enjoyable indoor activities don't provide the phytoncides, mycobacterium vaccae, negative air ions, vitamin D-producing sunlight, and other active ingredients found outdoors.
Cellular immune responses to mycobacteria in healthy and human immunodeficiency virus-positive subjects in the United States after a five-dose schedule of Mycobacterium vaccae vaccine.
Scientists discovered that mice that were fed the dirt bacteria Mycobacterium vaccae navigated complex mazes twice as fast as those which were not.
Inhibition of an established allergic response to ovalbumin in BALB/c mice by killed Mycobacterium vaccae. Immunology.
The bacterium, called Mycobacterium vaccae, is found in soil as well as air, especially in the countryside.