Mycobacterium ulcerans


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Related to Mycobacterium ulcerans: Buruli ulcer

My·co·bac·te·ri·um ul·'ce·rans

a bacterial species causing Buruli ulcers in humans; transmissible from soil, usually after an injury, and possibly by an insect vector.

Mycobacterium ulcerans

A causative agent of infections of the skin and the underlying soft tissues. It is a common cause of illness in tropical and subtropical Africa and South America, where it is responsible for Buruli ulcer. It is thought to be the third most common disease-causing mycobacterium (after M. tuberculosis and M. leprae) in humans.
See also: Mycobacterium

Mycobacterium ulcerans

An organism, of the same genus as those causing TUBERCULOSIS and HANSEN'S DISEASE (leprosy), that causes gross and extensive necrotic lesions called Buruli ulcer in affected people in endemic areas, mainly in West Africa.
References in periodicals archive ?
Difficulties to cultivate Mycobacterium ulcerans (MU) from contaminated environmental samples remains the main challenge in the identification of reproductive reservoir(s) for this Mycobacterium as well as the understanding of its transmission mode(s) from the MU contaminated environment to humans.
Abbreviations AFB: Acid-alcohol-fast Bacilli BCG: Bacilli Calmette-Guerin MU: Mycobacterium ulcerans PCR: Polymerase chain reaction PNUM: National Programme of Fight against Mycobacterium Ulcers B.U: Buruli ulcers.
The two relevant aspects of this case report are, firstly, the mechanism of Mycobacterium ulcerans dissemination in this multifocal form of BU and, secondly, the difficulty to conduct concomitantly BU treatment and ART.
Meyers, "Buruli ulcer (Mycobacterium ulcerans infection)," Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, vol.
Treatment costs of Mycobacterium ulcerans in the antibiotic era.
Several in vitro studies have been conducted on the susceptibility of Mycobacterium ulcerans to antimicrobials, leading to in vivo studies and clinical trials [18-20].
Mycobacterium ulcerans infections, which cause the chronic, necrotizing skin disease Buruli ulcer (BU), occur mainly in focalized areas in West Africa but have also been reported in Australia, Asia, and the Americas (1).
It was here that his interest in mycobacteria began, starting with studies on Mycobacterium ulcerans, the cause of Buruli ulcer (BU).
Caused by a bacterium known as Mycobacterium ulcerans, the disease starts as a painless, though sometimes itchy, swelling in the skin.
Mycobacterium ulcerans is a slow-growing organism that causes necrotizing infections of skin and soft tissue, often requiring reconstructive surgery and resulting in long-term disability (1,2).
Epidemiology of Mycobacterium ulcerans infection (Buruli ulcer) at Kinyara, Uganda.
Buruli ulcer (BU) is a potentially disabling affliction of inhabitants of tropical wetlands (1) caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans and characterized by necrosis of skin, subcutaneous tissue, and sometimes bone.