myasthenic crisis


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Related to myasthenic crisis: Tensilon test

crisis

 [kri´sis] (pl. cri´ses) (L.)
1. the turning point of a disease for better or worse; especially a sudden change, usually for the better, in the course of an acute disease.
2. a sudden paroxysmal intensification of symptoms in the course of a disease.
addisonian crisis (adrenal crisis) the symptoms accompanying an acute onset or worsening of addison's disease: anorexia, vomiting, abdominal pain, apathy, confusion, extreme weakness, and hypotension; if untreated these progress to shock and then death.
aplastic crisis a sickle cell crisis in which there is temporary bone marrow aplasia.
blast crisis a sudden, severe change in the course of chronic granulocytic leukemia, characterized by an increased number of blasts, i.e., myeloblasts or lymphoblasts.
catathymic crisis an isolated, nonrepetitive act of violence that develops as a result of intolerable tension.
celiac crisis an attack of severe watery diarrhea and vomiting producing dehydration and acidosis, sometimes occurring in infants with celiac disease.
developmental crisis maturational crisis.
hemolytic crisis an uncommon sickle cell crisis in which there is acute red blood cell destruction with jaundice.
hypertensive crisis dangerously high blood pressure of acute onset.
identity crisis a period in the psychosocial development of an individual, usually occurring during adolescence, manifested by a loss of the sense of the sameness and historical continuity of one's self, confusion over values, or an inability to accept the role the individual perceives as being expected by society.
life crisis a period of disorganization that occurs when a person meets an obstacle to an important life goal, such as the sudden death of a family member, a difficult family conflict, an incident of domestic violence (spouse or child abuse), a serious accident, loss of a limb, loss of a job, or rape or attempted rape.
maturational crisis a life crisis in which usual coping mechanisms are inadequate in dealing with a stress common to a particular stage in the life cycle or with stress caused by a transition from one stage to another. Called also developmental crisis.
myasthenic crisis the sudden development of dyspnea requiring respiratory support in myasthenia gravis; the crisis is usually transient, lasting several days, and accompanied by fever.
oculogyric crisis a symptom of an acute dystonic reaction in which the person demonstrates a fixed gaze, usually upward; also, the uncontrollable rolling upwards of the eye. It can be a result of encephalitis or a reaction to antipsychotic medications.
salt-losing crisis see salt-losing crisis.
sickle cell crisis see sickle cell crisis.
tabetic crisis a painful paroxysm occurring in tabes dorsalis.
thyroid crisis (thyrotoxic crisis) see thyroid crisis.
vaso-occlusive crisis a sickle cell crisis in which there is severe pain due to infarctions in the bones, joints, lungs, liver, spleen, kidney, eye, or central nervous system.

my·as·then·ic cri·sis

severe, life-threatening exacerbation of the manifestations of myasthenia gravis requiring intensive treatment.

myasthenic crisis

Any of a number of clinical complexes characterized by an acute exacerbation of myasthenia gravis symptoms, which are divided into
Myasthenic crisis
Myasthenic crisis An acute ↑ in requirement for anticholinesterase therapy or refractoriness to same, diagnosed by a Tensilon test, with transient ↓ of symptoms
Cholinergic crisis An acute ↓ in the need for anticholinesterase medication, resulting in 'overmedication' with the customary doses; the Tensilon test exacerbates this form of myasthenic crisis; cholinergic crises may be either
• Muscarinic crisis Abdominal pain, diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, lacrimation, blurred vision, bronchial hypersecretion due to parasympathetic hyperresponse
• Nicotinic crisis Muscle weakness, fasciculations, cramping and dysphagia, due to overdepolarization at the neuromuscular junction.  See Tensilon test  . ;.

my·as·then·ic cri·sis

(mīas-thenik krīsis)
Severe, life-threatening exacerbation of the manifestations of myasthenia gravis requiring intensive treatment.

my·as·then·ic cri·sis

(mīas-thenik krīsis)
Severe, life-threatening exacerbation of the manifestations of myasthenia gravis requiring intensive treatment.
References in periodicals archive ?
The number of death due to postoperative myasthenic crisis in the three groups was 3, 3, and 2.
However, complete resection could not avoid postoperative myasthenic crisis. In our series, despite efforts to reduce postoperative myasthenic crisis, such as preoperative intravenous immunoglobulin, it still occurred in 22.1% (40/181) of cases.
In conclusion, adjuvant radiation within 1 month after extended thymectomy may be helpful in controlling postoperative MG, such as decreasing the possibility of postoperative myasthenic crisis and raising cumulative probabilities of reaching CSR.
Patients with symptoms and signs of myasthenic crisis and admitted in Neurology ward, Medical ward and IMCU are registered for the study.
Patients in myasthenic crisis who were admitted in Neurology ward, Medical ward and IMCU were enrolled.
Arulneyam, "Pulmonary edema in myasthenic crisis," Case Reports in Critical Care, vol.
Miyata, "A case of transient left ventricular ballooning ("Takotsubo"- shaped cardiomyopathy) developed during plasmapheresis for treatment of myasthenic crisis," Journal of Clinical Neurology, vol.
There is little data published on initial airway management of prepubertal patients in myasthenic crisis. The unpredictable nature of these patients' respiratory status and poorly predictive values of their initial pulmonary function tests [7] make it difficult to decide between unnecessary intubation and iatrogenic harm and intubation prior to respiratory exhaustion.
This case describes a 7-year-old girl with anti-AChR negative, anti-MuSK positive JMG who presented in myasthenic crisis due to an upper respiratory viral infection.
Predictors of postoperative myasthenic crisis in patients with myasthenia gravis after thymectomy Chin Med J (Engl).
(25,26) As stress may cause disease exacerbation leading to a myasthenic crisis, a stress free as possible appointment is imperative.
The inability to swallow, speak or maintain an open airway, double vision, tachycardia, dysphagia, and profound muscle weakness are key signs of a myasthenic crisis. (29) Often due to increasing muscle weakness, patients increase their dosage of acetylcholinesterase medication not understanding that excessive doses will not relieve fatigue, but lead to increased muscle weakness and possible respiratory failure.