symbiosis

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symbiosis

 [sim″bi-o´sis, sĭm″bē-ō´sĭs] (pl. symbio´ses)
1. in parasitology, the biologic association of two individuals or populations of different species; it is classified as mutualism, commensalism, parasitism, amensalism, or synnecrosis, depending on the advantage or disadvantage derived from the relationship.
2. in psychiatry, a mutually reinforcing relationship between persons who are dependent on each other; a normal characteristic of the relationship between a mother and infant. adj., adj symbiot´ic.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

sym·bi·o·sis

(sim'bē-ō'sis),
1. The biologic association of two or more species. Compare: commensalism, mutualistic symbiosis, parasitism.
2. The mutual cooperation or interdependence of two people, such as mother and infant, or husband and wife; sometimes used to denote excessive or pathologic interdependence of two people.
[G. symbiōsis, state of living together, fr. sym- + bios, life, + -osis, condition]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

symbiosis

(sĭm′bē-ō′sĭs, -bī-)
n. pl. symbio·ses (-sēz)
1. Biology A close, prolonged association between two or more different organisms of different species that may, but does not necessarily, benefit each member.
2. A relationship of mutual benefit or dependence.

sym′bi·ot′ic (-ŏt′ĭk), sym′bi·ot′i·cal (-ĭ-kəl) adj.
sym′bi·ot′i·cal·ly adv.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

sym·bi·o·sis

(sim'bē-ō'sis)
1. The biologic association of two or more species to their mutual benefit.
Compare: commensalism, parasitism
2. The mutual cooperation or interdependence of two people, such as mother and infant or husband and wife; sometimes used to denote excessive or pathologic interdependence of two people.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

symbiosis

A close association, of interdependence or mutual benefit, between two or more organisms, often of different species.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

sym·bi·o·sis

(sim'bē-ō'sis)
1. Biologic association of two or more species.
2. Mutual cooperation or interdependence of two people.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Several studies on supplier-customer dyads demonstrate that high levels of mutual dependence increase information sharing and cooperation (Gulati & Sytch, 2007) and foster an atmosphere in which organizational commitment and trust increase (Gulati & Sytch, 2007; Kumar, Scheer & Steenkamp, 1995).
having direct mutual dependence. In our opinion heterogeneity is the link between the participants of sequential stages of production and sales process, and market participants having indirect dependence and related to different industries, i.e.
All were trapped in a sack of mutual dependence, and like polecats they have writhed around in it ever since.
In this delicate balance, there was symmetry in mutual dependence and vulnerability.
He told those assembled, "These are very difficult times for everybody," while noting that future success requires employers and working men and women to work in the spirit of mutual dependence and trust.
"I have often called Pakistan and Afghanistan conjoined twins, and the mutual dependence of both countries in terms of security, as well as social and economic development, bears out this analogy.
The eurozone's creeping fragmentation is primarily the result of the mutual dependence of banks and governments.
This is good for farming and food production but bad for wildlife.The mutual dependence of these flowers and bumble bees and other pollinating insects is one of the causes of the insects' decline.
The mutual dependence means that Bol.com has possibly managed to agree concessions with Docdata in the form of lower prices per transaction, according to Den Drijver.
Mutual dependence exists between the United States and Israel, but not symmetry.
Gul said the recent global economic crisis had shown how strong mutual dependence was, and the global economic crisis which stemmed from problems of developed market economies deeply affected developing and underdeveloped countries.