symbiosis

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Related to Mutual dependence: mutual interdependence

symbiosis

 [sim″bi-o´sis, sĭm″bē-ō´sĭs] (pl. symbio´ses)
1. in parasitology, the biologic association of two individuals or populations of different species; it is classified as mutualism, commensalism, parasitism, amensalism, or synnecrosis, depending on the advantage or disadvantage derived from the relationship.
2. in psychiatry, a mutually reinforcing relationship between persons who are dependent on each other; a normal characteristic of the relationship between a mother and infant. adj., adj symbiot´ic.

sym·bi·o·sis

(sim'bē-ō'sis),
1. The biologic association of two or more species. Compare: commensalism, mutualistic symbiosis, parasitism.
2. The mutual cooperation or interdependence of two people, such as mother and infant, or husband and wife; sometimes used to denote excessive or pathologic interdependence of two people.
[G. symbiōsis, state of living together, fr. sym- + bios, life, + -osis, condition]

symbiosis

/sym·bi·o·sis/ (sim″bi-o´sis) pl. symbio´ses   [Gr.]
1. in parasitology, the close association of two dissimilar organisms, classified as mutualism, commensalism, parasitism, amensalism, or synnecrosis, depending on the advantage or disadvantage derived from the relationship.
2. in psychiatry, a mutually reinforcing relationship between persons who are dependent on each other; a normal characteristic of the relationship between mother and infant.

symbiosis

(sĭm′bē-ō′sĭs, -bī-)
n. pl. symbio·ses (-sēz)
1. Biology A close, prolonged association between two or more different organisms of different species that may, but does not necessarily, benefit each member.
2. A relationship of mutual benefit or dependence.

sym′bi·ot′ic (-ŏt′ĭk), sym′bi·ot′i·cal (-ĭ-kəl) adj.
sym′bi·ot′i·cal·ly adv.

symbiosis

[sim′bē·ō′sis]
Etymology: Gk, syn, together, bios, life

symbiosis

[sim′bē·ō′sis]
Etymology: Gk, syn, together, bios, life
1 a mode of living characterized by a close association between organisms of different species.
2 a state in which two people are emotionally dependent on each other.
3 a pathologic inability of a child to separate from its mother emotionally and sometimes physically. symbiotic, adj.

sym·bi·o·sis

(sim'bē-ō'sis)
1. The biologic association of two or more species to their mutual benefit.
Compare: commensalism, parasitism
2. The mutual cooperation or interdependence of two people, such as mother and infant or husband and wife; sometimes used to denote excessive or pathologic interdependence of two people.

symbiosis

A close association, of interdependence or mutual benefit, between two or more organisms, often of different species.

symbiosis

close association, e.g. commensalism between two species, of benefit to both

sym·bi·o·sis

(sim'bē-ō'sis)
1. Biologic association of two or more species.
2. Mutual cooperation or interdependence of two people.

symbiosis

the biological association of two individuals or populations of different species, classified as mutualism, commensalism, parasitism, amensalism or synnecrosis, depending on the advantage or disadvantage derived from the relationship.
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