mustard

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mustard

 [mus´terd]
1. a plant of the genus Brassica.
2. the ripe seeds of Brassica alba (white mustard) and B. nigra (black mustard), whose oils have irritant, stimulant, and emetic properties.
3. resembling, or something resembling, mustard in one or more of its properties.
nitrogen mustard mechlorethamine.

mus·tard

(mŭs'tărd),
1. The dried ripe seeds of Brassica alba (white mustard) and B. nigra (black mustard) (family Cruciferae).
2. Synonym(s): mustard gas
[O.Fr. moustarde, fr. L. mustum, must]

mustard

(1) Black mustard, see there; Brassica nigra.  
(2) White mustard, see there; Sinapsis alba.

mus·tard

(mŭs'tărd)
1. A plant of the genus Brassica with pungent edible seeds.
2. A semisolid preparation of mustard seeds used as a condiment.
3. A material having the appearance or consistency of mustard (2).
[O.Fr. moustarde, fr. L. mustum, must]
References in periodicals archive ?
Over the decades, the size of supermarkets' mustard sections has grown with individual mustards, including ones that are certified organic.
The Rayes also offer several beer-infused mustards using local craft brews from the Shipyard and Sea Dog Brewing companies.
Although it will happen slowly, prepared mustards in jars (not the seeds or powders) lose their pungency over time.
Mustard Girl All American Mustards, a 100% American-made artisanal line of mustard produced in Pleasant Prairie, Wis., is launching nationwide.
This is probably the country's first mustard-inspired restaurant and an assortment of mustards, made in-house, are brought to the table to complement various dishes.
The menu focuses on traditional British dishes cooked with a twist and served with a range of specially blended mustards made by the restaurant's chefs to complement the food.
Cooking with Mustard Empowering Your Palate offers recipes for 16 widely different types of mustards and is a pick for any cook who wants to explore how to use them to best advantage.
Under the long time selections imposed by nature and human, Chinese vegetable mustards have evolved from original dwarf shape into great variations in root, leaf, stem and seed stalk forms(Qi et al., 2007).
The flavor stays the same, but some mustards get a little thicker (whisk in a tiny bit of water to loosen it back up).
The aim of the research is three-fold: provide organic farmers with an alternative to hand-pulling, burning and other laborious methods of weed control in specialty crops including peppermint and potted ornamentals; develop value-added uses for seed meal, should mustards prove useful in making biodiesel; and diminish environmental risks possibly resulting from conventional herbicide use.
Witney-based Shaken Oak Products, a leading manufacturer of hand-made mustards and a member of Heart of England Fine Foods (HEFF), has joined forces with The Chiltern Brewery to produce two exclusive speciality mustards for sale in the Brewery's shop.
The plant, brassica, was given the common name "mustard" after the condiment, and there are three most common types: White (or yellow) mustard, brassica alba, the mildest of the three is most common in American ballpark-style mustards; brown mustard, brassica juncea, from which strong Dijon mustard is made; and black mustard, brassica nigra, the strongest variety, found most often in India and the Middle East.