mussel

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mussel

(mŭs′əl)
n.
1. Any of various marine bivalve mollusks that attach to hard surfaces in intertidal areas with byssal threads, especially the edible members of the family Mytilidae and in particular Mytilus edulis, a blue-black species of the North Atlantic Ocean, raised commercially for food.
2. Any of numerous freshwater bivalve mollusks of the order Unionoida that burrow in the sand or mud of rivers, streams, and ponds.
3. Any of several similar bivalve mollusks, such as the zebra mussel.

mussel

A bivalve mollusk belonging to the class Pelecypoda.

mussel

the bivalve mollusc Mytilus edulis.
References in periodicals archive ?
Cycles of reproduction and condition in Tasmanian blue mussels, Mytilus edulis planulatus.
Reseeding of mussels on denuded rocky shores: preliminary studies with the Brown mussel.
STUDY: Changes to the DNA integrity of mussels was detected after exposure to the sound of a ship's motor
Julie Cuela, 62, who has been selling mussels at a public market in Sucat, Paranaque, for 10 years now, said she finds selling mussels a lucrative trade.
The oldest are now eighteen months old, and Skorupa is hoping to release her first 150 brook floaters in several controlled studies come spring, once the permits are in order and her mussels are declared free of any known fish diseases.
4 Add the mussels and cider, turn up the heat then cover and steam them open in their own juices for 3-4 minutes, giving the pan a good shake every now and then.
For the first time, the Government of British Columbia is ensuring there will be dedicated, significant annual funding for B.C.'s Invasive Mussel Defence Program, to help protect the provinces waterways from the environmental, economic and social impacts these invasive species can have.
Mussels act as "filter feeders" by taking in large amounts of water and then filtering out bacteria, algae and suspended particles before passing the clean water back into the river.
However, in the transplantation experiments (Kautsky et al., 1990; Norberg and Tedengren, 1995; Reimer and Harms-Ringdahl, 2001) mussels were taken from different geographical populations.
At this stage the mussels, about a third of a millimetre long, are collected in plankton nets and transferred to plastic tubs containing a mixture of organic detritus and commercial concentrated algae.
In spite of the benefits from spices, the impact on health of people consuming high amounts of wheatpurple rice flour mixed with mussel powder remains unstudied and requires clarification.
The Department of Interior is critical for augmenting efforts of the States in preventing the spread of invasive mussels through such means as establishing and delegation invasive species operating watercraft inspection stations and invasive mussel monitoring.