variation

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var·i·a·tion

(var'ē-ā'shŭn),
1. Deviation from type, especially the parent type, in structure, form, physiology, or behavior.
2. Synonym(s): type (3)
[L. variatio, fr. vario, to change, vary]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

variation

(vâr′ē-ā′shən, văr′-)
n.
1.
a. The act, fact, or process of varying.
b. The extent or degree to which something varies: a variation of ten pounds in weight.
2. Biology The existence within a species or other group of organisms of differences in form, function, or behavior, especially when hereditary.

var′i·a′tion·al adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

var·i·a·tion

(var'ē-ā'shŭn)
Deviation from the type, especially the parent type, in structure, form, physiology, or behavior.
[L. variatio, fr. vario, to change, vary]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

variation

  1. ecophenotypic variation (see ECOPHENOTYPE caused by local factors, as opposed to genetic factors, in an organism.
  2. any differences (both genotypic and phenotypic) between individuals in a population or between parents and their offspring. see GENETIC VARIABILITY.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Phish turned Ween's "Roses Are Free" into a jubilant and bouncy quasi-holiday breakup song which reached a chiming crescendo, while the McConnell-led Phish original ""It's Ice," captivated the crowd with its poetic lyrics, bizarre musical variations and souped-up instrumentals.
The final section of this book is a particularly effective survey of a disparate group of musical variations upon A Midsummer Night's Dream by composers including Henry Purcell, John Frederick Lampe, Felix Mendelssohn, and Erich Wolfgang Korngold, en route to Britten.
Essays in Aesthetics, after the initial account of the author's career, features articles on general aesthetics ("What Aesthetic Values?," "Axiological Relations"), on painting ("The Two Kinds of Abstraction," a discussion of Canaletto's The Stonemason's Yard, an analysis of Zola's portrait by Manet in "The Gaze of Olympia," "Pissaro at L'Hermitage"), on music ("Songs without Words," "The Other of the Same," about musical variations), and on literature.
Unlike earlier cinematic renderings of gangsta characters and more like Rusty Cundieff's satirical Fear of a Black Hat (1993), Clockers problematizes the "hard" exterior associated with both their cinematic and musical variations. [4] Strike is relatively soft--he drinks a Yoo Hoo-like soft drink called Moo Moo rather than the ubiquitous "forties" malt liquor; he collects and plays with model trains; and, most importantly, he's often emasculated in the face of authority.