mural

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mural

 [mu´ral]
pertaining to or occurring in a wall of an organ or cavity.

mu·ral

(myū'răl),
Relating to the wall of any cavity.
[L. muralis; fr. murus, wall]

mu·ral

(myū'răl)
Relating to the wall of any cavity.
[L. muralis; fr. murus, wall]

mural

On the wall of a hollow organ or structure.
References in periodicals archive ?
O'Connell, If These Walls Could Talk: Community Muralism and the Beauty of Justice (Collegeville, MN: Liturgical, 2012).
(24.) The history of muralism in Canada in this period is discussed at greater length in Kirk Niergarth, "'Mexico is the Dream': Mexican Muralism, Canadian Art, and Cultural Nationalism, 1920-1950," in Andrew Nurse and Mike Fox, eds., Dynamics and Trajectories: Canada and/in North America (Halifax, 2011), 44-71; and Niergarth, "Art, Education, and a 'New World Society': Joseph McCulley's Pickering College and Canadian Muralism, 1934-1950," Journal of Canadian Studies, 41 (January 2007): 172-201.
Minister of Education Jorge Zalamea was deeply involved in the political sphere and, as a supporter of Gomez Jaramillo's work, was determined to incorporate muralism in Colombia; he assisted the artist with attaining a grant from the government to travel to Mexico from 1936 to 1938.
Asco's relationship to the systems of production, display, and reception of contemporary art and accepted artistic strategies within the Chicano art community, largely dominated by the essentialist and nationalistic narratives of muralism, is one of disidentification.
and Japan; Mexican muralism from the early-twentieth century;
context, see Anna Indych-Lopez, Muralism without Walls: Rivera, Orozco, and Siqueiros in the United States, 1927-1940 (Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press, 2009).
(11.) For more on Diego Rivera's mural painting in San Francisco, and its relationship to 1930s muralism in U.S.
The exhibition will conclude with a discussion of the impact of the Mexican Revolution on the United States in three very important areas: the resettlement of Mexican refugees in the US; the introduction of muralism in Mexico, particularly by Los tres grandes (Orozco, Rivera, Siqueiros); and the growing acceptance of Mexican folkways in the US, particularly in the border area.
In this paper the authors show how the movement of muralism starts following certain ideas about the significance of art in social life, and later how they became important, ideological speaking, but also politically when they did not let other artists to develop their art.
However, visual culture in Latin America and the Caribbean has been an expression of modernity and a powerful symbolic medium used by nations to promote ideologies as well as by others to challenge and question them (with Mexican muralism perhaps being the most representative case).
What is troubling here is that the Mujeres Muralistas, an internationally recognized collaborative group that "dared to change the course of muralism by wrenching itself free from its male-dominated base, and working collectively as women" (p.92), was, according to Rodriguez, invited to consider participating in WACK!
Finally, in a largely biographical essay, Alejandro Anreus chronicles the life of Argentinian painter and photographer Antonio Berni in the 1930s, as he engaged sporadically with various groups on the left and debated Siqueiros on the nature of muralism in Argentina.