Munchausen syndrome by proxy


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Munchausen syndrome by proxy

 [mun´chow-zen]

Mun·chau·sen syn·drome by prox·y

(mūn'chow-zĕn),
a form of child maltreatment or abuse inflicted by a caretaker (usually the mother) with fabrications of symptoms and/or induction of signs of disease, leading to unnecessary investigations and interventions, with occasional serious health consequences, including death of the child.

Munchausen syndrome by proxy

n.
A psychiatric disorder in which a parent or other caregiver seeks attention from medical professionals by causing or fabricating signs or symptoms of illness in a child.
A term coined by Roy Meadow for a condition in which a parent, guardian, or spouse deliberately injures a person in his or her care—usually a child or vulnerable adult—or relates symptoms that his/her ward does not in fact have, for a primary gain, such as controlled substances to be later sold, or a secondary gain such as attention and sympathy

Mun·chau·sen syn·drome by prox·y

(MSP) (mūn'chow-zĕn sindrōm proksē)
Child abuse inflicted by a caretaker (usually the mother) with fabrications of symptoms and/or induction of signs of disease, leading to unnecessary investigations and interventions, with occasional serious health consequences, including death of the child. Also called factitious illness by proxy.
References in periodicals archive ?
Evaluation of covert video surveillance in the diagnosis of Munchausen syndrome by proxy: Lessons from 41 cases.
Munchausen syndrome by proxy. Archives of disease in childhood, 57(2), 92-98.
(28) Richard Meadow, Munchausen Syndrome by Proxy: The Hinterland
"Whatever the outcome, I hope that this hearing does not overshadow all the work he has completed over his long and distinguished career, including on Fabricated or Induced Illness, which was formerly known as Munchausen Syndrome by Proxy. "His work has undoubtedly saved the lives of many children."
Munchausen syndrome by proxy or medical child abuse: Part I.
Munchausen syndrome by proxy is the practice of fabricating or exaggerating illness or sickness onto another person, usually a child.
Munchausen Syndrome by Proxy (MSBP) is an unusual form of child abuse in which a parent fabricates symptoms and falsifies medical history or actually causes illness that results in unnecessary medical evaluation and treatment (Meadow, 1977).
Munchausen syndrome by proxy is an unusual form of child abuse in which a parent, usually the mother, brings a child for medical attention with symptoms that have either been falsified or directly induced by the parent, resulting in the child being subjected to unnecessary and extensive medical investigation.
They discuss the problem of child abuse and neglect; presentation and evaluation; the history and health care interview; physical examination for physical and sexual abuse; laboratory findings, diagnostic testing, and forensic specimens in cases of sexual abuse; sexually transmitted infection in the context of maltreatment; differential diagnosis; clinical aspects; documentation; mental health aspects; sexual abuse of adolescents; Munchausen syndrome by proxy; Child Protective Services; legal issues; the relationship between intimate partner violence and child maltreatment; risks to children in the digital age and with social networking; prevention of child maltreatment; human trafficking; substance dependence and child maltreatment; and forensic nursing.
Munchausen Syndrome by Proxy (MSP) is a disturbing diagnosis that should be considered when persistent signs and symptoms defy adequate explanation despite extensive testing.
He compared the case with "mass hysterias" of America's Salem witch hunts, communism fears of McCarthyismin America and Munchausen syndrome by proxy in the UK, where a spate of cases were brought over parents allegedly killing their babies.
This reference on fabricated or induced illness (FII) in a child (previously known as Munchausen syndrome by proxy) aims to promote a multidisciplinary and multi-agency approach with a child welfare focus.