Münchausen's syndrome

(redirected from Munchausen's syndrome)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to Munchausen's syndrome: Munchausen syndrome by proxy, Factitious disorder

Münchausen's syndrome

[mun′chousənz]
Etymology: Baron von Münchausen, German adventurer and confabulator, 1720-1797
an unusual condition characterized by habitual pleas for treatment and hospitalization for a symptomatic but imaginary acute illness. The affected person may logically and convincingly present the symptoms and history of a real disease. Symptoms resolve with treatment, but the person may seek further treatment for another imaginary disease. Also called pathomimicry.

Munchausen's syndrome

The systematic practice of deliberate and calculated simulation of disease so as to obtain attention, status and free accommodation and board. People engaging in this activity study medical textbooks and report a plausible list of symptoms of a usually serious condition so as to elicit medical interest and admission to hospital. They have a preference for surgical conditions and often display an unusual number of operation scars—a circumstance that may give the game away. Detection is inevitable and is followed by the disappearance of the ‘patient’. Baron Munchausen was the hero of the outrageously implausible pseudo-autobiographical tales of the novelist and criminal psychopath Rudolf Eric Raspe. The syndrome was so named, and first described, by Richard Asher in his book Talking Sense , published in 1972.
References in periodicals archive ?
Treatment for Munchausen's syndrome usually involves psychiatric counseling to change the thoughts and behaviours that are causing the condition.
The true incidence of Munchausen's syndrome is unknown.
A review of 298 cases was ordered after three mothers were cleared of killing their children following concerns over misdiagnosis of Munchausen's Syndrome by Proxy.
Yet this mother is being described as suffering from Munchausen's Syndrome by Proxy: in other words, she's just poorly.
She was suffering from Munchausen's Syndrome by proxy (MSbp) - a rare mental disorder where a person gets emotional satisfaction from inflicting injury on another so they require medical treatments.
One of the conditions investigated was Munchausen's syndrome by proxy where a carer causes injury to a child to draw attention to herself.
Mr Coonan also read statements from doctors in support of Prof Southall, who was awarded an OBE in 1998 and is an expert on Munchausen's Syndrome By Proxy.
He accused Andrea, 36, of having Munchausen's Syndrome by Proxy - partly because she was overweight.
Prof Meadow was already well-known for his 1977 academic paper on Munchausen's Syndrome by Proxy, the syndrome where parents are said to fabricate their child's illness, resulting in unnecessary hospital admissions and even death.
Police investigating the case suspected Hamilton, 38, suffered from Munchausen's Syndrome by proxy, a mental condition that causes people to hurt others to get attention.
Full browser ?