mimicry

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mimicry

(mĭm′ĭ-krē)
n. pl. mimic·ries
Biology The resemblance of one organism to another or to an object in its surroundings for concealment and protection from predators.

mimicry

(mim′i-krē)
The practice or instance of one organism copying or mimicking another organism or object, sometimes for concealment from predators.

mimicry

the adoption by one species of any of the properties of another, such as colour, habits, structure. Particularly common in insects, two main forms of mimicry are recognized:
  1. Batesian mimicry, where two species have the same appearance (often warning colours) but one (the ‘model’) is distasteful to predators. The mimic gains advantage because predators learn to associate appearance with bad taste and leave both model and mimic uneaten.
  2. Mullerian mimicry, where both model and mimic are distasteful to predators and both gain from the other's distastefulness since the predator learns to avoid all similar-looking forms, whichever it eats first.
References in periodicals archive ?
Evolutionary consequences of a Batesian-Mullerian spectrum: a model for Mullerian mimicry. Evolution 30:86-93.
The origin of rampant intraspecific variation in butterflies protected by Mullerian mimicry presents an evolutionary paradox, as noted by Ford (1953) and Turner (1977).
Batesian and Mullerian mimicry are unlikely because both these snail species are cryptically colored and are palatable to many animal taxa (McCracken 1976; pers.
Indeed, Brower speculates, birds in Florida may discover that these micrating monarchs are safe to eat, thereby thwarting the mutually beneficial Mullerian mimicry between the viceroy and the monarch.
The second major feature of unpalatable prey is that they frequently show remarkable pattern convergence both within species and between species (Mullerian mimicry).