Müller cells

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Müller cells

Supporting cells that extend through the retina to form its inner and outer limiting membranes.
References in periodicals archive ?
The team did so by changing Muller glia cells in the retina into rod photoreceptors.
Specialist cells in the eye known as Muller glia divide and turn into light-sensitive cells.
Early studies led to the idea that dying retinal cells release signals that trigger support cells in the retina called Muller glia to dedifferentiate--return to a stem-like state--and proliferate.
Zhao et al., "Neural stem cell properties of Muller glia in the mammalian retina: regulation by Notch and Wnt signaling," Developmental Biology, vol.
Recently, Xu and colleagues reported the existence of canonical circadian clock genes in mammalian retinal Muller glia. This study not only demonstrated that retinal Muller cells generate molecular circadian rhythms isolated from other retinal cell types but also demonstrated that these retinal cells exhibit unique features of their molecular circadian clock compared to the retina as a complex system.
This is possible because the zebrafish retina contains cells called Muller glia that harbor a gene that allows them to regenerate.
Muller glia are intriguing candidates for intrinsic retinal stem cells.
These Muller glia cells - a type of adult stem cell - is capable of transforming into the specialised cells in the back of the eye and could be useful for treating a wide range of sight disorders.
These Muller glia cells are a type of adult stem cell capable of transforming into the specialised cells in the back of the eye and may be useful for treating a wide range of sight disorders.
Our results showed that ganglion cells, Muller glia, and interplexiform cells were present in both morphants (Figures 3(e)-3(g)); however, most of them were mislocalized and unlike those of the normal retina (Figures 3(a)-3(c)).
Following injury, Muller glia cells dedifferentiate into a stemlike state and proliferate to replace lost retinal cells [24].
The pathogenic role of Muller glial cells in the neovascular process is explained in the subsequent chapter and the activation of Muller glia by pro-inflammatory factors is described.