motor proteins


Also found in: Dictionary.

motor proteins

The protein classes of myosins, kinesins and dyneins. Also known as molecular motors. There are more than 40 myosins, they function in muscle contraction and some other processes, and move along filaments of the protein actin. Kinesins are concerned in transport of proteins, organelles and vesicles along microtubules and chromosome segregation. Dyneins are very large molecules that power cilia and flagella. All the motor proteins are powered by energy from ATP binding, hydrolysis and release. Molecular proteins convert chemical energy (ATP) into kinetic energy.
References in periodicals archive ?
Mitochondria are transported bidirectionally by interactions with molecular motor proteins, such as kinesin-1 for anterograde movement and dynein for retrograde movement, and those attach via adaptor proteins such as the mitochondrial Rho-Milton complex and dynactin, respectively [14].
Myosin is a family of ATP-dependent motor proteins and is mainly involved in muscle contraction.
Sperry (Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, East Carolina University School of Medicine) presents protocols exploiting the functional and structural diversity of molecular motor proteins, the proteins which produce energy for movement in cellular processes.
Myosins are a class of 40 motor proteins that power cell movement and muscle contractions.
The spindle matrix protein NuMA, the centrosomal protein 4D2, and the spindle motor proteins Kif2, KR[P.sub.110] and KR[P.sub.170] all localized to these structures.
The findings involve a class of DNA motor proteins called helicases.
These include (1) the shuttling of electrons and protons across the inner fatty zones of bacterial cellular membranes by quinone molecules, a key step in the cells' energy-generating process; (2) the rotary action of several enzyme complexes; and (3) the movement along a track by certain motor proteins, especially the kinesins.
The shape changes necessary for cell migration depends on dynamic organisation and force generation from the cells internal actomyosin cytoskeleton, which is made up of structural actin filaments and contractile myosin motor proteins.
Having created a gel that can replicate contractions, Saleh and Fygenson are now looking to refine their technique and enable distinct movements, such as twisting and crawling, or using other motor proteins that would allow the gel to mimic other cell behaviors, such as shape-shifting and dividing.
Myosins are a family of ATP-dependent motor proteins and are best known for their role in muscle contraction.
Coating those lines with so-called motor proteins made microtubules scurry along the ridges.
Research into the activity of key motor proteins suggests that a unique form of random motion powered by thermal energy may play a vital role in moving enzymes and other chemicals inside cells.