Motor Assessment Scale


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Motor Assessment Scale

An eight-item measurement tool used to assess motor function and physical mobility after a stroke.
See also: scale
References in periodicals archive ?
Evaluating motor recovery early after stroke: comparison of the Fugl Meyer Assessment and the Motor Assessment Scale.
A mitigating factor here is that this final patient, C1, was actually one of three patients with the second highest Motor Assessment Scale advanced hand activities score at baseline (table 2).
Dean CM, Mackey FH (1992) Motor Assessment Scale scores as a measure of rehabilitation outcome following stroke.
Motor assessment scale for stroke patients concurrent validity and interrater reliability.
Table 5: Motor Assessment Scale (MAS) scores on rehabilitation admission and discharge Rehabilitation Functional ability Admission Rehabilitation (Total score = 6) ([section]) Score Discharge Score Supine[R] Side lying onto 0 1 Intact Side Supine[R] Sitting Over 1 2 Side of Bed Balanced Sitting 1 4 Sitting[R] Standing 0 2 Walking 0 2 Upper Arm Function 5 5 Hand Movements 6 6 Advanced Hand 6 6 Movements TOTAL (48) 19 28 ([section]) For a full description of scoring, please refer to Wade DT (1992): Measurement in Neurological Rehabilitation.
Predictors were the Functional Independence Measure (Kidd et al 1995), Motor Assessment Scale (Carr et al 1985), Modified Elderly Mobility Scale (Kuys and Brauer 2006), admission walking speed measured using the 10-m Walk Test (Wade et al 1987), and Timed Up and Go (Podsiadlo and Richardson 1991) measured on admission to rehabilitation.
Investigation of the new motor assessment scale for stroke patients.
A commonly used tool to measure motor recovery and functional ability following stroke is the Motor Assessment Scale (MAS) (Carr et al 1985).
Concurrent validity has been confirmed by comparison with the upper limb component of the Fugl-Meyer Assessment and the Motor Assessment Scale (MAS) (Van der Lee et al 2001).
Patients were included if they were currently immobile, defined as scoring less than 3 points on Item 5 (Walking) of the Motor Assessment Scale (Carr et al 1985); had not yet developed an ankle contracture, defined as their affected ankle dorsiflexion being within 10 degrees of their intact ankle; and were able to walk before their stroke.