syringomyelia

(redirected from Morvans disease)
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Related to Morvans disease: Neuromyotonia

syringomyelia

 [sĭ-ring″go-mi-e´le-ah]
a slowly progressive syndrome in which cavitation occurs in the central (usually cervical) segments of the spinal cord; the lesions may extend up into the medulla oblongata (syringobulbia) or down into the thoracic region. It may be of developmental origin, arise secondary to tumor, trauma, infarction, or hemorrhage, or be without known cause. It results in neurological deficits that generally consist of segmental muscular weakness and atrophy accompanied by a dissociated sensory loss (loss of pain and temperature sensation, with preservation of the sense of touch), and thoracic scoliosis is often present. Called also cystic myelopathy and Morvan's syndrome.

sy·rin·go·my·e·li·a

(sĭ-ring'gō-mī-ē'lē-ă), [MIM*186700 and MIM*272480]
The presence in the spinal cord of longitudinal cavities lined by dense, gliogenous tissue, which is not caused by vascular insufficiency. Syringomyelia is marked clinically by pain and paresthesia, followed by muscular atrophy of the hands and analgesia with thermoanesthesia of the hands and arms, but with the tactile sense preserved; later marked by painless whitlow, spastic paralysis in the lower extremities, and scoliosis of the lumbar spine. Some cases are associated with low grade gliomas or vascular malformations of the spinal cord.
[syringo- + G. myelos, marrow]

syringomyelia

(sə-rĭng′gō-mī-ē′lē-ə)
n.
A chronic disease of the spinal cord characterized by the presence of fluid-filled cavities and leading to spasticity and sensory disturbances.

sy·rin′go·my·el′ic (-ĕl′ĭk) adj.

syringomyelia

Neurology A disorder characterized by damage to the spinal cord, caused by formation of a fluid-filled cavity within the spinal cord, due to trauma, tumors, or congenital defects; the cavity begins in the cervical region and slowly expands, causing progressive pressure-related damage to the spinal cord. Cf Spinal cord trauma.

sy·rin·go·my·e·li·a

(si-ring'gō-mī-ē'lē-ă)
The presence in the spinal cord of longitudinal cavities lined by dense, gliogenous tissue, which are not caused by vascular insufficiency. Syringomyelia is marked clinically by pain and paresthesia, followed by muscular atrophy of the hands and analgesia with thermoanesthesia of the hands and arms, but with the tactile sense preserved; it is later marked by painless whitlows, spastic paralysis in the lower extremities, and scoliosis of the lumbar spine. Some cases are associated with low-grade astrocytomas or vascular malformations of the spinal cord.
Synonym(s): hydrosyringomyelia, Morvan disease.
[syringo- + G. myelos, marrow]

syringomyelia

A rare brainstem or upper spinal cord defect in which the central canal progressively expands and damages adjacent nerve tracts. There is loss of pain and temperature sensation in the neck, shoulders and upper limbs followed by muscle wasting and loss of the sense of touch. Later, there is paralysis and SPASTICITY and progressive disablement.

Morvan,

Augustin Marie, French physician, 1819-1897.
Morvan chorea - continuous involuntary quivering of muscles at rest. Synonym(s): myokymia
Morvan disease - the presence of longitudinal cavities in the spinal cord. Synonym(s): Morvan syndrome; syringomyelia
Morvan syndrome - Synonym(s): Morvan disease