Morton's neuroma

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Morton's neuroma

Orthopedics A type of perineural fibrosis, which is not a true neuroma Clinical Sharp, burning pain, commonly between the 3rd and 4th metatarsal heads, worse with pressure, better with rest Management Conservative–metatarsal pads in insole, loose footwear–ie, tight high heels, ski boots, bike shoes ganz verboten; blocks with a local anesthetic and steroids; surgery if conservative measures fail; if Sx are limited to one web space, surgical outcome is excellent in up to 90%
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Morton's neuroma

A condition featuring painful enlargement of interdigital nerves between the third and fourth metatarsal heads. Also called interdigital neuroma. Treatment is by change of footwear, steroid injections or surgical excision of the affected nerve.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
A AS I described several weeks ago Mortons Neuroma is a swelling of the nerve as it passes between the bones of the foot which causes pain when it is compressed.
(24) Jigna Jani (2013) Histologic Evaluation of Intermetatarsal Mortons Neuroma. Journal of the American Podiatric Medical Association: May 2013, Vol.
Whereby the pain is caused by some form of nerve compression or entrapment seems to be accepted by both of the Mortons and a number of other authors discussing the subject in the late 19th Century; although again "Mortons Neuroma" does not figure in their writings, instead such authors use the terms already mentioned as well as "Neuralgia" or "Neuritis" (viz: Erskin 1877, Dana 1885, NYMJ 1892, Roswell 1892 etc).
Betts confirmed that Mortons neuroma pain was attributed to a swelling of the interdigital nerve...." such tomes being apparently unaware that generations of a veritable plethora of Physicians from Durlacher onwards, had been proposing along these lines, and TSK Morton in his 1895 publication specifically states; "....
On the subject of terminology used by the professional Radiographers /Sonographers performing the procedures and providing a report thereon, it is not unusual for the terms; 'low reflectivity' and 'hypoechoic region (or lesion, or area)' to be used interchangeably by them to describe an area that can be consistent with the presence of a Mortons Neuroma' (or Intermetatarsal Perineural Fibrosis if such a term is preferred by them).
A positive suggestion of Mortons Neuroma is when you or the patient feel, or occasionally hear, a click.
Podiatry Hive Percutaneous Cryoablation of Mortons Neuroma (Lecture) Andrew Williams