mortify

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mortify

(môr′tə-fī′)
v. morti·fied, morti·fying, morti·fies
v.tr.
To cause to experience shame, humiliation, or wounded pride.
v.intr.
To undergo mortification; become gangrenous.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Mortifications come from the management and co-residents.
The Mortifications, Derek Palacio's beautifully written debut novel, begins in 1980, during the Mariel boatlift that took refugees from Cuba to the United States.
an abandoning of the Cross, a contempt for little mortifications, a scorning of anything that in some way involves sacrifice and self-denial.
(13) He stated: "In my view, everyone should bring himself into a state of love of God, love of Israel, and love of Torah; and there is no need for mortifications." (14)
She captures in a telling vignette toward the end of her book the complex relationship between the deeply ascetic generation of women who experienced the French wars of religion and their daughters who were less given to penitential mortifications of the flesh and more inclined toward charitable service.
The differences in the two women's experiences--one withdrawing from the world and practicing harsh mortifications, the other working in the world supervising charitable endeavors--demonstrate the evolution of female Catholic spirituality in Paris between two great crises--the wars of the Holy League in the late sixteenth century and the Fronde in the mid-seventeenth.
Whatever indignities and mortifications he is having to endure at the moment, he will be thoroughly enjoying himself.
Like those in religious orders, members take a vow of obedience, which Opus Dei calls a "contract." Much of the group's spiritual discipline--including daily Mass and prayer, regular instruction from a spiritual "director," weekly confession, and, for some, "mortifications" (self-flagellation)--evokes the stringency common in religious orders before the reforms of the Second Vatican Council (1962-65).
Simultaneously flooded by spiritual doubts and the desire to live a life of perfection, the adolescent Maria subjected herself to harsh bodily mortifications su ch as sleeping on the floor, abstaining from certain foods (she vowed to eat only greens and corn tortillas), and wearing a self-fashioned hairshirt.
The astonishing, often macabre, content of the stories told brings the reader right into the cells of the lauras of the sixth century, so that one feels the passion of the quarrel for and against Chalcedon, the ascetic distrust of bishops, and the bizarre mortifications of the Himalayan climbers of the spiritual ascent in search of the heavenly vision.
The man who is insured with the Indescribable walks the world in armour of proof; those contrary accidents and mortifications which are a source of spiritual profit to the saint, are a source of material advantage to him.
But Manrique stubbornly refused to marry and persisted in her devotions and mortifications, all the while beseeching the Lord that "he calm down her mother and give her a change of heart so that she would not bother her, nor importune her on the matter of marriage."(19)