convergent evolution

(redirected from Morphological convergence)
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Related to Morphological convergence: convergent evolution, Hox genes

evolution

 [ev″o-lu´shun]
the process of development in which an organ or organism becomes more and more complex by the differentiation of its parts; a continuous and progressive change according to certain laws and by means of resident forces.
convergent evolution the development, in animals that are only distantly related, of similar structures or functions in adaptation to similar environments.

con·ver·gent ev·o·lu·tion

the evolutionary development of similar structures in two or more species, often widely separated phylogenetically, in response to similarities of environment; for example, the wing-like structures in insects, birds, and flying mammals.

convergent evolution

con·ver·gent ev·o·lu·tion

(kŏn-vĕr'jĕnt ev'ŏ-lū'shŭn)
The evolutionary development of similar structures in two or more species, often widely separated phylogenetically, in response to similarities of environment; for example, the wings in insects, birds, and flying mammals.

convergent evolution

1. The process in which phylogenetically distinct lineages acquire similar characteristics.
2. Evolutionary changes in which descendants resemble each other more closely than their progenitors did.

convergence

or

convergent evolution

or

parallelism

a form of evolution which results in unrelated organisms independently producing similarities of form, usually because they become adapted to living in similar types of environment. For example, fish and cetaceans have evolved similar streamlined body shapes and fins.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Incongruence between morphotypes and genetically delimited species in the coral genus Stylophora: phenotypic plasticity, morphological convergence, morphological stasis or interspecific hybridization?
A remarkable morphological convergence exists between Palaeozoic problematic tubeworms and calcareous polychaete tubeworms, including (1) encrusting, substratecemented, nonspiral tubes, e.g.
Pinto-da-Rocha & Kury (2003) were the first to point out some morphological convergences between them, including large body size, stout and long legs bearing few spines, and robust and heavily armed pedipalps.
The genus Santinezia shows several morphological convergences with the genus Goniosoma (Gonyleptidae), which is endemic of the Atlantic Forest (Kury 2003).