morpheme

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mor·pheme

(mōr'fēm),
The smallest linguistic unit with a meaning.
[G. morphē, form + -eme, from phoneme, G. phēmē, utterance]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

morpheme

The smallest semantically meaningful unit of a spoken language (words, prefixes or suffixes) that have discrete meanings. The formal study of morphemes is termed morphology.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

morpheme

(mor'fem)
The smallest meaningful grammatical unit in a language (e.g., the s in “beds”).
See: phoneme
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners

morpheme

The smallest element of speech that conveys either factual or grammatical information. Compare with phoneme which is a speech sound that serves to distinguish one word from another.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Morpho-syntactic errors were the focus of research in the publication by Crespo Garcia (1999).
We also expect that the Semantic Anaphora measure of working memory span should yield higher and more reliable correlations with inferential performance than the standard reading span measure (RST), and the Morpho-Syntactic Anaphora measure.
The role of FASTR in our approach primarily consists in the identification of morpho-syntactic variants for terms discovered by the previous, term extraction process.
Subskills that have been identified and studied include phonological awareness, vocabulary knowledge, memory, morpho-syntactic knowledge, background knowledge, inference and reasoning skills, metacognitive strategies, as well as a number of additional subskills.
</pre> <p>He argues that "the change from [muna] to [immani] to [muni] was probably made for reason of style, avoiding repetition, rather than for morpho-syntactic subtlety." This somewhat contradicts his paradigm (p.
In Part II on "Linguistic Aspects" (159-222), Lurati discusses in six concise chapters the quantitative and qualitative methodologies of research on idioms; attempts at a typology; Europeanisms and intercultural borrowings; the regional origin of idioms; synonymity and reinterpretation; semantic and morpho-syntactic features in idiomatic formation.
He suggests that dialect mixing and competition for domains have led to the simplification and levelling of certain phonological and morpho-syntactic features.
Likewise, the study's incorporation of morpho-syntactic issues into the study of metaphor makes the need to account for other approaches to "meaning in form" all the more obvious.