morning after pill


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A high-dose oestrogen pill given in the early post-ovulatory period to prevent implantation of a potentially fertilised egg after unprotected intercourse

morn·ing af·ter pill

(mōr'ning af'tĕr pil)
An oral medication, consisting of two pills taken 12 hours apart that, when taken by a woman within 2-3 days after intercourse, reduces the probability that she will become pregnant.
Synonym(s): emergency contraceptive, emergency hormonal contraception, postcoital contraception.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, as morning after pills are available from pharmacists and other locations the true figure is likely to be higher.
The morning after pill -sold under the name Levonelle prevents an embryo implanting in the womb.
What, tell parents their under-age girls have been given a morning after pill? You must be kidding!
Any woman who requests the morning after pill must be asked a series of questions to make sure government guidelines are met.
The morning after pill helps prevent pregnancy if taken with 72 hours of failed contraceptive use.
Previously, the morning after pill was available free only if a woman got a prescription from a GP or a family planning clinic.
Though the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) previously found that girls under 17 years of age could safely use the emergency contraception pills, Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius overruled that decision, an act that Korman said was "politically motivated, scientifically unjustified, and contrary to agency precedent." The government had been fighting Korman's ruling, without much success, as last week the 2nd Circuit ordered the unrestricted sale of the two-pill version of the morning after pill. And now the government will allow Plan B One-Step to be sold over the counter.
The survey of more than 3,000 people across theUK revealed more than one in 50 women had used the morning after pill three timesormoreinthepast12 months, while one in 56 women aged 18-21 admitted using the morning after pill more than five times.
THE morning after pill, under the brand name Levonelle, has been available over the counter at pharmacies since 2001 and costs about pounds 25.
Pharmacist Aleysha Begum, a temp filling in for the normal chemist, refused point blank to prescribe the morning after pill saying she was morally and religiously against it.
A WOMAN was refused the morning after pill because the chemist was Muslim and said it was "against her religion".