Morita therapy


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Morita,

Shomei, 20th century Japanese physician.
Morita therapy - psychotherapy based on elements of conduct in Zen Buddhism.
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Adopt the Morita therapy. It focuses on teaching patients to accept their emotions without trying to control them, since their feelings will change because of their actions.
In contrast, Morita therapy, created by Shoma Morita of Japan, focuses on teaching patients to accept their emotions without trying to control them, since their feelings will change as a result of their actions.
Morita therapy is not meant to eliminate symptoms; instead it teaches us to accept our desires, anxieties, fears, and worries, and let them go.
The occupational therapist used a mindfulness based approach, employing concepts of Morita Therapy and Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (Harris, 2009; Sugg, Richards, & Frost, 2016) to encourage acceptance of visual deficits and also connected the patient value of independent living to using community resources.
Brief references to psychosynthesis, Morita Therapy, and 12-step programs provide some theory, and mentions of popular books, including The Secret and The Purpose Driven Life, provide contrast for his own thoughts.
Morita therapy: its basic features and cognitive intervention for anxiety treatment.
France, Cadieax, and Allen (1995) described the theoretical link between Morita Therapy and letter writing.
As mentioned within the context of Morita therapy (France et al., 1995), letters between counselor and client have the potential to become an integral, continual part of the counseling process.
Further, counselors should consider using counseling approaches such as Morita therapy (Kondo, 1953; Morita, 1976) that employ a more passive and other-oriented approach to problem solving.
Morita therapy: Zen Buddhism applied to psychotherapy.