moral treatment

(redirected from Moral therapy)

mor·al treat·ment

a type of milieu therapy used in the 19th century, emphasizing religious doctrine and benevolent guidance in activities of daily living; as such it was a form of psychotherapy as opposed to somatic treatments such as bloodletting and purging.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

moral treatment

A therapeutic and preventive philosophy for managing mental disorders, which was popular in the early 19th century, based on William Tuke’s retreat model. Treatment consisted of removing the afflicted from their homes and placing them in a surrogate “family” of 250 members or less, often under the guidance of a physician. It emphasised religious morals, benevolence and "clean living", in contrast to the somatic therapies of the day (such as bloodletting or purging). Physical restraints were removed from the patients, they were accorded humane and kindly care, and were required to perform useful tasks in the hospital.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

moral treatment

An approach to treating mental illness in the 19th century influenced by humanistic philosophy and a belief that a rational, caring approach would enable patients to normalize their thoughts and actions.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
This historical contribution puts him in the league of some of the most renowned personalities in the 18th century known for the moral therapy movement in the field of psychiatry such as William Tuke of the UK, Philippe Pinel of France and Benjamin Rush of the USA.
A significant portion of this recovery included "moral therapy," which promoted activities such as gardening, wood-working, playing games, sewing, and reading in addition to medical care.
While most early practitioners of the moral therapy movement generally favored bibliotherapy, what the patients should read was open to a much wider interpretation.
From the pedagogical perspective, this demand (28) for a critical examination of impressions--which I shall refer to as DC--is not merely a demand for a Socratic self-examination (if it were just that, it could hardly be singled out as one of Epictetus innovations): although a process of examination of the set of beliefs we hold is, as we shall see, an integral part of Epictetus' moral therapy (29), DC requires more than that.
If so, we must either acknowledge the presence of a serious problem between Epictetus' psychology of action and his moral therapy or put DC into question.
Ziff, a scholar of psychiatric history, explores the history of the asylum in the context of the asylum and the moral therapy movements of the 19th century.
The asylum as a workplace changed significantly with the introduction of moral therapy and as a consequence work practices of attendants become primarily a caring rather than a custodial role.
The authors begin with an overview of 17th century "Moral therapy" and progress through the development of the medical model in the 19th and 20th century to the various paradigms of the second half of the 20th century that accompanied deinstitutionalization.
What he needs to provide, however, is a kind of moral therapy by which we can adjudicate them.
"With the decline of moral therapy in the second half of the nineteenth century and the rise of a more somatically based model of psychiatric disorders, the patient's body rather than his or her mind or environment became an increasingly important site of therapeutic intervention." (p.
A historical study might explore the appearance and reality of philosophy as moral therapy in a sophisticated pagan society.
Under the aegis of the Department of Industry and Publicity, Mary Black promoted state-directed professional development, technical training, and expert assistance in the modern use of design and colour by skilled Europeans who would dissuade Nova Scotians from using "garish" colours and encourage them to depict nature "properly." Black was a liberal progressive professional, guided by the ideals of efficiency, competitiveness, moral therapy, and commerce; she wanted to see handicrafts integrated into the market.