jawbone

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jawbone

(jô′bōn′)
n.
A bone of the jaw, especially the bone of the lower jaw.
v. jaw·boned, jaw·boning, jaw·bones Slang
v.tr.
To try to influence or pressure through strong persuasion, especially to urge to comply voluntarily.
v.intr.
To urge voluntary compliance with official wishes or guidelines.

jaw′bon′er n.
jaw′bon′ing n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

man·di·ble

(man'di-bĕl) [TA]
A U-shaped bone, forming the lower jaw, articulating by its upturned extremities with the temporal bone on either side.
Synonym(s): jaw bone, mandibula, submaxilla.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

jawbone

Unscientific term used to indicate the maxilla or mandible.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners

man·di·ble

(man'di-bĕl) [TA]
U-shaped bone (in superior view), forming lower jaw, articulating by its upturned extremities with temporal bone on either side.
Synonym(s): jaw bone, lower jaw, mandibulum, submaxilla.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
After all, he shared with Douglass, and other leading Black abolitionists, an abiding faith in moral suasion: an integrationist ideology.
Moral suasion refers to a policy in which the government or the Central bank uses persuasion rather than regulatory force to convince financial sector participants to take a particular action.
Churches and their councils are voluntary organizations, and church leadership is based upon moral suasion, which lacks enforcement measures.
Moral suasion proved to be useless, because everyone was already convinced of the moral rightness of the cause.
However, Palmer says that "backed by the G-20, it exercises powerful moral suasion and has shown that it can exercise significant influence over the standard setters, such as the Basel Committee, which has been the vehicle for strengthening banking capital standards.
The use of laws and moral suasion, under the guise of "supervision," were the tools available to authorities trying to contain crime and vice among tribal members in urban centers.
Instead, he calls for "moral suasion" from leaders.
But banking law lecturer, Moses Foh-Amoaning, has dismissed the Bank of Ghana's assertion that moral suasion is the only option available to it to control the interest rates charged by the commercial banks.
All of these scenarios took into account the inability of existing political organizations to achieve these changes; instead they focused on the moral suasion that the right person could exercise to convince the regime of the necessity of genuine reform.Aa
Sectional approaches to solving this problem were different, however, as Southern church leaders generally eschewed political solutions, preferring the pulpit's propensity for moral suasion to control aberrant behavior.
"They were trying to use moral suasion. Now they're going to shame them.
"The church hierarchy now seeks through legislative action to accomplish something it has failed to get through its own efforts at moral suasion," Lynn remarked.