monotreme

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Related to Monotremes: Placentals

mon·o·treme

(mon'ō-trēm),
A member of the order Monotremata.

monotreme

(mŏn′ə-trēm′)
n.
Any of various egg-laying mammals of the order Monotremata of Australia and New Guinea, whose only living members are the platypus and the echidnas.

mon′o·trem′a·tous (-trĕm′ə-təs) adj.

monotreme

any mammal of the primitive subclass Monotremata, including the duck-billed platypus and spiny anteater. Monotremes differ from other mammals in laying eggs, and in having a single opening (CLOACA) for the passage of eggs or sperm, faeces and urine. They inhabit Australia and New Guinea.
References in periodicals archive ?
At present, sequencing of the whole genome of more than 100 mammalian species, including marsupial and monotreme species is available as well as that of many other vertebrate species including reptiles, birds and fish.
With the exception of the monotremes, all mammals have two sets of teeth.
The wildlife includes an amazing and interesting blend of the familiar (countryside inhabited by millions of sheep and cows), the expected though unusual (kangaroos and koalas) and the significantly strange (like platypus and echidna walking down the road--one of two egg laying mammals I guess that are actually called monotremes).
The platypus is one of only three monotremes, or egg-laying mammals, still found on earth today.
Never learned the difference between mitochondria and monotremes? No matter--you may still have a shot at a side career in science.
(45) For the platypus' eggs and marsupial reproduction see Kathleen Garnette Dugan, 'Marsupials and Monotremes in Pre-Darwinian Theory', PhD thesis, University of Kansas, 1980.
They are called monotremes. After the babies hatch out of their eggs, they drink milk from their mother.
* 20 species of mammals declared extinct, with almost half of Australia's marsupials and monotremes listed as extinct, endangered or vulnerable.
These two biological traits are so rare in mammals that scientists classify the platypus, (along with one other Aussie animal in the world, the echidna) as monotremes (meaning "one hole").
birds, reptiles, and monotremes) and refrigerators.
On the counterfactual view, though, PLATYPUS refers to platypuses in virtue of the platypus-PLATYPUS law: the laws connecting monotremes, vertebrates and so on with PLATYPUSes are semantically secondary.