mononeuropathy

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Related to Mononeuropathies: sensorimotor polyneuropathy

mon·o·neu·rop·a·thy

(mon'ō-nū-rop'ă-thē),
Disorder involving a single nerve.

mononeuropathy

/mono·neu·rop·a·thy/ (-ndbobr-rop´ah-the) disease affecting a single nerve.
multiple mononeuropathy , mononeuropathy mul´tiplex mononeuropathy of several different nerves simultaneously.

mononeuropathy

[-noo͡rop′əthē]
Etymology: Gk, monos + neuron, nerve, pathos, disease
any disease or disorder that affects a single nerve trunk. Some common causes of disorders involving single nerve trunks are electric shock, radiation, and fractured bones that may compress or lacerate nerve fibers. Casts and tourniquets that are too tight may also damage a nerve by compression or by ischemia. The peripheral nerve trunks are especially vulnerable to compression and entrapment.

mononeuropathy

Mononeuritis Neurology A peripheral neuropathy characterized by loss of movement or sensation in a single nerve group Etiology Damage/destruction of an isolated nerve/nerve group, which may be systemic or, more commonly, due to direct trauma, prolonged pressure, or compression by adjacent structures

mon·o·neu·rop·a·thy

(mon'ō-nūr-op'ă-thē)
Disorder involving a single nerve.

mononeuropathy

A disorder affecting a single nerve. This may be due to nerve compression, as in the CARPAL TUNNEL SYNDROME, the THORACIC OUTLET SYNDROME or SATURDAY NIGHT PALSY, or other trauma or to DIABETES.

mononeuropathy

neuropathy affecting tissues supplied by a single nerve, e.g. lower-limb effects of common peroneal nerve trauma

mononeuropathy

a lesion or lesions affecting a single peripheral nerve.

mononeuropathy multiplex
neuropathy involving a number of peripheral nerves but in a random manner.
References in periodicals archive ?
The other 69% (138) patients have various abnormalities in nerve conduction studies in the form of asymptomatic sensory axonopathy predominantly affecting the lower limbs in 27% (54) patients, motor mononeuropathy and multiple mononeuropathies in 21% (42) patients and sensorimotor demyelinating and axonal neuropathy in 21% (42) patients.
The prevalence of median mononeuropathies in our sample of US Army dental personnel far exceeded that previously reported in the general population.
Median mononeuropathies at or distal to the wrist have previously been reported in the dental assistant population.
In a population such as the Soldiers enrolled in a dental assistant training program that were studied here, it is reasonable to expect that subclinical upper extremity mononeuropathies secondary to repetitive overuse may be present.
We will not discuss the evaluation of other peripheral neuropathic processes--eg, mononeuropathies, plexopathies, or motor neuronopathies such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.
In a population such as the dental assistants studied here, it is reasonable to expect that subclinical upper extremity mononeuropathies secondary to repetitive overuse may be present.
Femoral nerve compression is an uncommon clinical entity when compared with other mononeuropathies.
Apart from the usual features, the following unusual features of HSP have also been described: epistaxis, focal neurological deficits, seizures, intracranial hemorrhage, peripheral mononeuropathies, pulmonary hemorrhage, pulmonary interstitial disease, myocardial infarction, and cardiac tamponade.
Mononeuropathies as well as peripheral polyneuropathies were observed and are presumed to be caused by ischemia of the nutrient arteries.