monomer

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monomer

 [mon´o-mer]
1. a simple molecule of relatively low molecular weight, which is capable of reacting chemically with other molecules to form a dimer, trimer, or polymer.
2. some basic unit of a molecule, either the molecule itself or some structural or functional subunit of it, e.g., an individual polypeptide in a multi-subunit protein.
fibrin monomer the material resulting from the action of thrombin on fibrinogen, which then polymerizes to form the fibrin clot.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

mon·o·mer

(mon'ō-mĕr),
1. The molecular unit that, by repetition, constitutes a large structure or polymer; for example, ethylene, H2C=CH2, is the monomer of polyethylene, H(CH2)nH.
See also: subunit (1).
2. The protein structural unit of a virion capsid.
3. The protein subunit of a protein composed of several loosely associated such units, usually bound noncovalently.
[mono- + -mer]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

monomer

A single unit of a multiunit molecule, which are joined to form dimers, trimers and polymers; hydrolysis of polymers yields monomers.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

monomer

A single unit of a multiunit molecule, which are joined to form dimers, trimers, polymers; hydrolysis of polymers yields monomers. Cf Polymer.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

mon·o·mer

(mon'ō-měr)
1. The molecular unit that, by repetition, constitutes a large structure or polymer.
2. The protein structural unit of a virion capsid.
See: virion
3. The protein subunit of a protein composed of several loosely associated such units, usually noncovalently bound together.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

monomer

One of the chemical groups many of which are repetitively linked together to form a POLYMER.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

monomer

any molecule that can exist alone or with other similar molecules to form a polymer.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

mon·o·mer

(mon'ō-měr)
1. The molecular unit that, by repetition, constitutes a large structure or polymer.
2. The protein structural unit of a virion capsid.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The Methacrylate Monomers Market is driven by various application and end user industry.
However, clinical reports have shown the presence of variable amounts of residual monomers in an acrylic dentures base.7,21-23 Factors such as temperature, time, initiator concentration, curing environment (water bath v/s microwave), pressure, mixing ratio and denture base thickness have an effect on the residual monomer content.23,24 One additional factor affecting the cytotoxicity of acrylic is the polymer powder to monomer liquid ratio.25,26
"The construction of the new plant for specialty monomers is an important strategic step," said Christoph Riemer, head of dispersible polymer powder business at Wacker Polymers.
The monomers in container 2 are continuously added to the monomer mixture in the well-stirred container 1.
The judgement will be important in clarifying REACH rules relating to monomers and polymers, which are currently exempted from its controls because there are so many it is currently impractical to register them.
It consists of two entities: fructose linked by [beta](2-->1) bonds that terminate with a glucose monomer; and fructose linked by [beta](2-->1) bonds, but with no glucose.
In the single MZCR reactor, the first zone starts out rich in propylene monomer (and a comonomer, if desired).
Global Acrylic Monomers Market report brings into focus studies about market definition, market segmentation, and competitive analysis in the market.
Mechanical and biological consequences of un-polymerized residual monomers have also been studied extensively.5,6 A number of studies have reported various degrees of in-vitro cytotoxicity and invivo allergic responses to leached residual monomers.7-10 Mechanical properties of acrylic denture base resins, such as hardness and flexural strength, have also been known to be adversely effected by the extent of un-polymerized monomers within the matrix.11,12
Five water-soluble acrylamide monomers and a photoinitiator have been introduced by the company.