monism

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mo·nism

(mō'nizm),
A metaphysical system in which all of reality is conceived as a unified whole.
[G. monos, single]

mo·nism

(mō'nizm)
A metaphysical system in which all of reality is conceived as a unified whole.
[G. monos, single]
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References in periodicals archive ?
See, for example, Ibn Taymiyya's request of an ordeal by fire to test the claims of Sufi Monists, in Ibn Taymiyya, Majmu' al-fatawa, 11: 459-68.
Although the monist model readily accommodates the use of ICC findings by the ICJ, by understanding international law as a cohesive whole, this approach cannot be seen as satisfactory either.
working monists tend to assume that rules of customary international law
But for a monist like Green, since their bodies had died, the persons also would be dead.
(66) My interpretation of the essential epistemological identity of naturalistic monism with materialism agrees with that of German philosopher Rudolf Eucken, who called the monists' claim to weigh both spirit and matter equally a fallacy.
As Stanlis shows, Frost's argument is aimed primarily at the hubristic rationalists, monists, and optimists of his own day.
Pulling from 23 years of close friendship and lengthy conversations with Frost, Stanlis says Thompson was a narrow-minded materialistic monist who never understood that Frost was a philosophical dualist.
Bhartrhari on the other hand, is an idealist and monist. For him, the phenomenal world is known because the mind is conscious of it, and consciousness is nothing but word-potent.
One might argue that monist worldviews are being applied to a performance resistant to monism, but it might also be that Mitchell's critics are not entirely incorrect in their conclusions.
The monist view that is most commonly expressed in the literature of radical behaviorism is that of physicalism:
What the task of journalism requires in this context is to report both people of faith and liberal monists without fear or favor--and accurately.
He discusses two main narratives-one of decline, the other of progress-and divides Afrocentrists into "civilizationists," who are cultural monists, and cultural relativists, who are multicultural.