monism


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Financial, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

mo·nism

(mō'nizm),
A metaphysical system in which all of reality is conceived as a unified whole.
[G. monos, single]

mo·nism

(mō'nizm)
A metaphysical system in which all of reality is conceived as a unified whole.
[G. monos, single]
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
However, Tocqueville offers additional insights into how modern society tends toward monism. He argues that in an age of equality, "it becomes an ardent and often blind passion of the human spirit to discover common rules for everything, to include a great number of objects under the same formula, and to explain a group of facts by one sole cause" (p.
Since Plato, monism fell in disrepute and was replaced by a tendency to place unity and plurality together; proclaiming unity in spite of diversity.
Therefore, aside from the fact that one finds a considerable variety of cosmological views among them, which would imply different shades of monism, I deem it inappropriate to set those attempts or suggestions advanced by the Neo-Confucian philosophers (who never demanded that people should accept their cosmological insights by faith) against the Christian tenet, "I believe in one God, Creator of Heaven and Earth."
As such Reality, as outlined in Surjective Monism, has 7 (seven) meta-differential ontic-epistemic levels.
143) The position is a radical monism in that all dichotomies are eschewed.
This view about the relation of monism and dualism to the question
Paradoxism may be seen as a continuous loop, which warps back on itself, as a kind of "dualistic monism" or "monistic dualism", or as the kind of synthesis that "swallows-up" all dualistic polar opposites into itself, negates the exclusive validity of any one side of pair of opposites, including the pair dualism and nondualism (monism)-and thus "transcends" both.
Central to the collection is a critique of dispositional monism (or pandispositionalism), the view that all fundamental properties are ungrounded powers.
This consistent stuff is sometimes beaten thin and sometimes it is quite weighty, in keeping with the poem's self-description in part 2: it is "about the pre-socratic idea of the // dispositional axis from stone to wind, wind / to stone (with my elaborations, if any)." Or, more precisely, it is about the doctrine of material monism expounded by Anaximenes "in a plain and unadorned Ionic diction," according to the report of Diogenes Laertius.
Amma creates her vision of spirituality by drawing on the universalistic monism of Advaita Vedantic [Hindu] discourses and offering an expansive interpretation of Hinduism.
The second chapter on the prose, on "Monism and Protestant toleration," continues to press Donnelly's thesis that Milton's "arguments for Protestant toleration embody his alternative to the binaries of modern rationalism" (49).