mongoloid

(redirected from Mongolic)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

mongoloid

 [mon´go-loid]
1. pertaining to or resembling the Mongols, a group in Central Asia.
2. old term for certain features characteristic of an individual with down syndrome.

Mongoloid

(mŏng′gə-loid′, mŏn′-)
adj.
1. Of or being a human racial classification traditionally distinguished by physical characteristics such as yellowish-brown skin, straight black hair, dark eyes with epicanthic folds, and prominent cheekbones and including peoples indigenous to central and eastern Asia. No longer in scientific use. See Usage Note at Negroid.
2. Characteristic of or resembling a Mongol.
3. also mongoloid Offensive Of or relating to Down syndrome.
n.
1. A member of the Mongoloid racial classification. No longer in scientific use.
2. also mongoloid Offensive A person with Down syndrome.

mongoloid

(mŏn′gō-loyd)
1. Concerning Mongols.
2. Characterized by mongolism (i.e., Down syndrome).
References in periodicals archive ?
There is a striking resemblance of Uyghur buya and Khalkha Mongolian buya; however, the word is certainly not borrowed from Khalkha; rather, the low vowel in Uyghur buya is the result of an internal Turkic development, while the sound written <a> in the second syllable of the Khalkha word reflects an internal Mongolic devel opment (28) (Posch 1964: 124).
(28) On the other hand, although the sound changes in Turkic and Mongolic have lead to slightly different results in terms of phonetics, we may note a certain similarity in terms of sound development in the Turkic-Mongolic contact area.
negative auxiliary verbs) with a back-vocal stem + (*)k can assumingly be derived from the Altaic (Mongolic and Turkic) negation words.
Reinterpreted in Mongolic fashion, this transcription represents something like qad[??]u.
If we convert this transcription into a more conventional Mongolic form, we obtain *ta[??]bat, where once again we see a metathesis of the two middle consonants.
Why is it that we take an agnostic approach to the broader genetic relationships (Altaic, Uralic, even Ugric), yet build our analysis on groupings like Finnic, Samoyedic and Mongolic, rather than individual languages such as Finnish, Nenets and Khalka?
Within Turkic, Mongolic, and Tungusic languages (i.e.
Linguists specializing in the Mongolic, Turkic, and Tungusic languages share some of their recent findings.
Returning to Middle Mongol, he considers such aspects as derivational morphology, the Mongolic verb stem, and the link between the stem and the suffix.
In the conception of the authors, Altaic comprises not only the conventionally recognized Turkic, Mongolic, and Tungusic groups, but Korean and Japanese as well.
This is also the case in Modern Mongolic languages in general (Campbell 1995: 348; Janhuman 2003: 22); Turkish (Kornfilt 1997: 383), and in Bantu (Werner 1919: 159).
Where the other Altaic languages, those of the Turkic and Mongolic families, are relatively homogeneous, Tungusic represents a highly diverse linguistic family, making it of especial importance for working out the phonology and structure of Altaic as a whole.