monad

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monad

 [mo´nad]
1. a single-celled protozoon or coccus.
2. a univalent radical or element.
3. in meiosis, one member of a tetrad.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

mon·ad

(mon-'ad),
1. A univalent element or radical.
2. A unicellular organism.
3. In meiosis, the single chromosome derived from a tetrad after the first and second maturation divisions.
[G. monas, the number one, unity]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

monad

(mō′năd′)
n.
1. Philosophy An indivisible, impenetrable unit of substance viewed as the basic constituent element of physical reality in the metaphysics of Leibniz.
2. Biology A single-celled microorganism, especially a flagellate protozoan formerly classified in the taxonomic group Monadina.

mo·nad′ic (mə-năd′ĭk), mo·nad′i·cal adj.
mo·nad′i·cal·ly adv.
mo′nad·ism n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

mon·ad

(mō'nad)
1. A univalent element or radical.
2. A unicellular organism.
3. In meiosis, the single chromosome derived from a tetrad after the first and second maturation divisions.
[G. monas, the number one, unity]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

monad

  1. any single-celled organism.
  2. a single cell resulting from meiosis (instead of a tetrad).
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
As a rule, the protagonist is, in Dolezel's terms, an "epistemic monad" and always finds the conditions of his or her habitation disagreeable and uncommon.
One might object to the reading I am suggesting by noting that the temporal states of a monad are temporary perceptual states and that these are actual rather than possible.
Now, as we know, instead of the atom Leibniz introduces the "monad" as the ultimate substance of the world, and with it we come at last to plura-monism proper.
This perspective enabled him to conceive of all things as essentially motion albeit two different kinds of motion, and thereby to overcome the Cartesian dualism of thought and extension In his Monadology, Leibniz attempted to identify "simple substances" in the form of monads or atoms as "the elements of things." These simple substances are noncomposite and do not come into existence by "natural means": They are, in short, the building blocks of the universe.
Computational lambda-calculus and monads. In the Symposium on Logic in Computer Science.
To see this, let us compare the use of monads in Haskell with the use of side effects in SML.
In Nietzsche: Volume One: The Will to Power as Art, Heidegger makes a tantalizing remark concerning how Leibniz's ontology of monads and affects is really the basis of understanding Nietzsche's equally Baroque ontology.
Chapter 2 investigates the sense in which monads are "in" a body and why bodies are phenomena despite the fact that all of their parts are true substances.
In the papers [8] and [17], the notion of distributive law was generalized by weakening the compatibility conditions with the units of the monads. A so defined weak distributive law A [cross product] B [right arrow] B [cross product] A also induces an associative multiplication on B [cross product] A but it fails to be unital.
It is quite wonderful to contemplate The Organs of Sense as the tragicomic illustration of Leibniz's universe of self-contained monads between which no communication is possible.
All the unparticipated monads are referred to the 'one,' because all are analogous to the 'one.' ...