molecule

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molecule

 [mol´ĕ-kūl]
a group of atoms joined by chemical bonds; the smallest amount of a substance that possesses its characteristic properties.
adhesion m's (cell adhesion m's (CAM)) cell surface glycoproteins that mediate intercell adhesion in vertebrates.
middle molecule any molecule that has an atomic mass between 350 and 2000 daltons; these accumulate in the body fluids of patients with uremia.

mol·e·cule

(mol'ĕ-kyūl),
The smallest possible quantity of a di-, tri-, or polyatomic substance that retains the chemical properties of the substance.
[Mod. L. molecula, dim. of L. moles, mass]

molecule

The smallest unit of a substance that can exist alone and retain its core chemical and physical characteristics.

trivial name

A popular, working, or common name for a thing or process that has a formal name. See CD, DSM-IV, EC, SI.
Trivial name
Disease–eg, Lou Gehrig's disease for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis
Molecule–eg, Teflon for polytetrafluoroethylene
Organ–eg, anterior pituitary for adenohypophysis
Structure–eg, vocal cord for vocal fold–plica vocalis, or fallopian tube for tuba uterina, which is not standard nomenclature or based on 'official' rules delineated by international agencies or organizations–eg, American Psychiatric Association, Enzyme Commission, the International System, Terminologia Anatomica, etc

mol·e·cule

(mol'ĕ-kyūl)
The smallest possible quantity of a di-, tri-, or polyatomic substance that retains the chemical properties of the substance.

molecule

the smallest chemical unit of matter that has the characteristics of the substance of which it forms a part.

mol·e·cule

(mol'ĕ-kyūl)
The smallest possible quantity of a di-, tri-, or polyatomic substance that retains the chemical properties of the substance.
References in periodicals archive ?
In recent experiments, Lindsay and his colleagues at Arizona State and Columbia University turned to oligoaniline molecules, which link together as polyaniline.
MATCHMAKER Traditionally, when researchers set out to make a chemical, they mix reactant A with reactant B at high concentrations in the hope that molecules of each will randomly collide to form the target product.
"Similar to X-ray crystallography, which has given eyes to the scientist to see molecules, force spectroscopy provides us with hands to feel them," he says.
When mixed with water and poured onto a glass surface, the modified polymer molecules assembled into sheets that resembled cell membranes.
Although astrochemists have found organic molecules in space before (SN: 5/1/04, p.
"We know there are a lot of these molecules present in space, but we don't know what kind of molecules were delivered to the Earth or to Mars," says Alexander Tielens of the University of Groningen in the Netherlands.
Researchers suspect that small molecules like proflavine were widespread on early Earth.
For almost a century, industrial chemists have had to rely on hellishly high temperatures and gas pressures to cleave the tenacious chemical bond that holds together each two-atom nitrogen molecule. That done, chemists can use the nitrogen from the atmosphere to make fertilizers, explosives, and other modern products.
As water's temperature decreases to and falls below the normal freezing point, more and more of its molecules self-organize into clusters that have structures based on the tetrahedron, a pyramid with a triangular base.
Taking a different approach, Rudolf Grimm and his colleagues at the University of Innsbruck in Austria cooled 100,000 two-atom lithium molecules into a supermolecule.
Rather than encode Is and Os on the basis of the amount of charge stored in a memory cell, as conventional memory chips do, the UCLA approach encodes data in catenane molecules, each of which has two interlocked rings.
When these altered peptides encounter DQ2 or DQ8 molecules in the intestine, they form molecular complexes that activate immune cells called T cells, which then mount an attack on the intestinal lining.