water content

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water content 

Water in a contact lens expressed as a percentage of the total mass of the lens in its hydrated state under equilibrium conditions with physiological saline solution containing 9 g/l sodium chloride at a temperature of 20 ± 0.5ºC and with a stated pH value.
where M is the mass of hydrated lens, m is the mass of dry lens.The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has categorized hydrogel contact lenses into four groups according to their water content and their surface reactivity (referred to as ionic if it contains more than 0.2% ionic material, and nonionic otherwise). Group 1: water content less than 50% and non-ionic. Group 2: water content greater than 50% and non-ionic. Group 3: water content less than 50% and ionic. Group 4: water content greater than 50% and ionic.
References in periodicals archive ?
""In contrast, preparing land for cultivation with a chisel plough, or a deep subsoiler preserves moisture in the soil and allows for economical land preparation.
By evaluating the temporal stability of moisture in the soil profile for the rainy (Figure 6) and dry (Figure 7) periods in the eucalyptus stand, we identified a behaviour similar to that observed for the entire study period.
While the researchers aren't certain about the reasons for this disparity, they suggest that all of the solar energy in the West creates favorable conditions for the development of rain, because "when you do get that moisture in the soil, that moisture can then evaporate, rise, and condense into clouds and rain," Tuttle explains.
Also, energy from the sun evaporates moisture in the soil, thereby cooling surface temperatures and also increasing moisture in the atmosphere, allowing clouds and precipitation to form more readily.
Mulching was the most effective treatment in capturing and storing moisture in the soil and concomitantly had the highest maize dry weights and grain yield among the three in situ water harvesting treatments.
Moreover, the change in capacitance given the presence of moisture in the soil was measured using an LCR meter (4263B, Agilent Technologies) with a working frequency ranging from 100 Hz to 100 kHz at a constant temperature of 25[degrees] C.