Mohs


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Mohs

(mōz),
Frederic E., 20th-century U.S. surgeon, who as a medical student devised a system of microscopically controlled removal of skin tumors. See: Mohs fresh tissue chemosurgery technique, Mohs chemosurgery.

Mohs

(mōz),
Friedrich, German mineralogist, 1773-1839. See: Mohs scale.
References in periodicals archive ?
Mohs assigned numbers to the various hardnesses, laying down the rule that a mineral can scratch all minerals with lower hardness numbers than its own.
According to the Ministry of Health (MOH), over the past week, the 937-Service Center handled 54,868 appointments at primary healthcare centers and 11,289 notifications, including 256 hospital transfer requests.
SHINE-1 was a randomised, placebo-controlled, double-blind (subject and investigator), parallel arm pilot trial designed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of EB-001A injections in patients undergoing Mohs micrographic surgery on the forehead.
Ingraffea then moved to Cincinnati to train in Mohs surgery under the direction of Hugh Gloster, MD, at the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine.
Chemotherapy often follows Mohs surgery to eliminate the residual superficial basal-cell carcinoma after the invasive portion is removed, some advocate the use of imiquimod prior to mohs surgery to remove the superficial component of the cancer.
Key words: Mohs micrographic surgery, Skin cancer, Basal cell carcinoma
"Anything made of a substance that is harder with a higher Mohs rating will scratch anything that is not as hard, meaning a sapphire screen could resist scratches from almost anything likely to be carried in a pocket," Business Insider said on its report.
* Consider recommending Mohs surgery for cancerous lesions that are longstanding or when there is a high risk of local recurrence or metastasis.
The Mohs hardness scale ranks rocks based on how easy or hard they are to scratch.
Jens Thiele said at the annual meeting of the American College of Mohs Surgery.
All underwent Mohs surgery at least once, and two received adjuvant therapy consisting of radiation therapy and cetuximab (Erbitux) for locally advanced disease.
British historian Mohs focuses her study on a single military campaign, the Arab Revolt of 1916-17, but also describes it as a case study of an intelligence community at odds with its government on policy matters, a topic she suggests some readers might find applicable beyond World War I and even resonant with current events.