mnemonic

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an·am·nes·tic

(an'am-nes'tik),
1. Assisting the memory. Synonym(s): mnemonic
2. Relating to the medical history of a patient.
3. Related to boosting immunity by repeated vaccination.

mnemonic

(nĭ-mŏn′ĭk)
adj.
Relating to, assisting, or intended to assist the memory.
n.
A device, such as a formula or rhyme, used as an aid in remembering.

mne·mon′i·cal·ly adv.

mnemonic

Any linguistic device, such as a rhyme, song verse, formula, acronym or other, which is used to jog the memory.

Example
SADCHALETS—A UK mnemonic used in the context of a major incident (mass disaster) for the information that the first police officer or other person on the scene should relay to their control room:
• S—survey the scene;
• A—assess the scene;
• D—disseminate to those who need to know (police, fire, ambulance, highways, etc.);

• C—casualties (how many, seriousness);
• H—hazards (HAZCHEM, fire, etc.);
• A—access routes for emergency services;
• L—location (exact position and give accurate directions to control room);
• E—emergency services (liaise with others so they know what has been done or needs to be done);
• T—ype of incident (e.g., two vehicle injury etc.);
• S—scene log, if appropriate (e.g., life threatening).

mnemonic

Any artifice–eg, rhyme, formula, acronym, used to jog the memory

an·am·nes·tic

(an'am-nes'tik)
1. Assisting the memory.
Synonym(s): mnemonic.
2. Relating to the medical history of a patient.
References in periodicals archive ?
Mnemonic techniques are strategies for organizing and/or encoding information which can enhance learning and improve later recall of information through an imagery eliciting process (Bellezza, 1981).
All mnemonic techniques can be classified as either organizational or encoding.
Facing the need to remember new, complex, and/or abstract material, the utilization of mnemonic techniques has been an effective, long-standing tool (Hutton, 1987; Iza & Gil, 1995; Male, 1996; Stephens & Dwyer, 1997; VanSandt, 2005).
We have found the use of mnemonic techniques to be effective learning tools for our auditing students.
To compare the performance of these two groups of subjects on tasks suited to mnemonic techniques with that on tasks less suited to them, rank orders of performance for all the subjects, plus TM and JR, were calculated.
Mean rank on (a) tasks conducive to the use of mnemonic strategies and (b) non-conducive to such strategies for 'natural' and 'strategic' memorizers 'Natural' memorizers 'Strategic' memorizers A B D JR C G H I TM (a) Story, pictures, 8.2 7.2 3.0 3.2 8.5 4.5 8.8 4.5 6.5 snow crystals (b) Faces, names, words, 10.5 7.4 7.0 5.4 2.3 3.0 4.3 5.1 4.9 telephone numbers These findings suggest that it may be possible to distinguish natural from strategic memorizers by means of a number of converging indices such as self-reported early natural memory ability, superior performance in close relatives, superior incidental long-term retention and differential performance on tasks suited and unsuited to the use of mnemonic techniques.
* Learn adaptive strategies such as mnemonic techniques (e.g., acronyms, rhymes, or stories), writing notes to yourself, eliminating distractions, establishing routines and getting organized.