mnemenic

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mne·men·ic

, mnemic (nē-men'ik, nē'mik),
Relating to memory.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

mne·men·ic

, mnemic (nē-men'ik, nē'mik)
Relating to memory.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in classic literature ?
I am inclined to think that, in the present state of physiology, the introduction of the engram does not serve to simplify the account of mnemic phenomena.
In like manner, we can collect all mnemic phenomena in living organisms under a single law, which contains what is hitherto verifiable in Semon's two laws.
This law would need to be supplemented by some account of the influence of frequency, and so on; but it seems to contain the essential characteristic of mnemic phenomena, without admixture of anything hypothetical.
Whenever the effect resulting from a stimulus to an organism differs according to the past history of the organism, without our being able actually to detect any relevant difference in its present structure, we will speak of "mnemic causation," provided we can discover laws embodying the influence of the past.
A "disposition" is not something actual, but merely the mnemic portion of a mnemic causal law.
the mnemic cause, X the occasion or stimulus, and Y the reaction.
If there is to be parallelism, it is easy to prove by mathematical logic that the causation in physical and psychical matters must be of the same sort, and it is impossible that mnemic causation should exist in psychology but not in physics.
It is perhaps worth while to observe that mnemic causation is what led Bergson to deny that there is causation.
The only reason that could be validly alleged against mnemic causation would be that, in fact, all the phenomena can be explained without it.
One of the first points to be urged is that mnemic phenomena are just as much to be found in physiology as in psychology.
We should, therefore, be compelled to allow the intrusion of mnemic causation, if admitted at all, into non-psychological regions, which ought, one feels, to be subject only to causation of the ordinary physical sort.
What we know is that memory, and mnemic phenomena generally, can be disturbed or destroyed by changes in the brain.