opioid

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opioid

 [o´pe-oid]
1. any synthetic narcotic that has opiate-like activities but is not derived from opium.
2. denoting naturally occurring peptides, such as enkephalins, that exert opiate-like effects by interacting with opiate receptors of cell membranes. See also opioid analgesic.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

o·pi·oid

(ō'pē-oyd),
Originally, a term denoting synthetic narcotics resembling opiates but increasingly used to refer to both opiates and synthetic narcotics.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

opioid

(ō′pē-oid′)
n.
Any of various compounds that bind to specific receptors in the central nervous system and have analgesic and narcotic effects, including naturally occurring substances such as morphine; synthetic and semisynthetic drugs such as methadone and oxycodone; and certain peptides produced by the body, such as endorphins. Also called opiate.

o′pi·oid′ adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

opioid

adjective Referring to opium-like activity, especially on receptors.
 
noun
(1) A drug that has narcotic effects similar to opium (Papaver somniferum) but is not derived from it.
(2) An endogenous peptide (e.g., endorphin) that acts on opioid receptors.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

opioid

Neurology A pain-attenuating peptide that occurs naturally in the brain, which induces analgesia by mimicking endogenous opioids at opioid receptors in the brain. See Opioid-mediated analgesia system.
Opioids
Agonists The most potent opioid agonists are morphine, meperidine, methadone; other opioids include hydromorphine–Dilaudid®, codeine, oxycodone–Percodan®, propoxyphene–Darvon®
Antagonists Naloxone–Narcan®
Mixed agonsts-antagonists Pentazocine–Talwin® 
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

o·pi·oid

(ō'pē-oyd)
A narcotic substance, either natural or synthetic.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

Opioid

Any morphine-like synthetic narcotic that produces the same effects as drugs derived from the opium poppy (opiates), such as pain relief, sedation, constipation and respiratory depression.
Mentioned in: Anesthesia, General
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

o·pi·oid

(ō'pē-oyd)
Originally, synthetic narcotics resembling opiates but increasingly used to refer to both opiates and synthetic narcotics.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012