maithuna

(redirected from Mithuna)

maithuna

A Sanskrit term used in Tantra for sexual union in the context of a ritual.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Some of the exclusive exhibits showcased in the gallery are Bronze sculptures of Parvati and Sridevi of Chola Period (brought back in 2016), Standing Buddha (returned by the Metropolitan Museum of Art in the year 1999), terracotta Mother Goddess of Mauryan period (brought back in the year 2016), Brahma-Brahmani (confiscated by Central Bureau of Investigation), Mithuna (seized in New York and brought back in the year 2010) and Kashmiri Harwan tile (returned to India by Consulate General of India, New York in the year 2016).
The role of Kirit Mankodi (14) in the retrieval of Brahma-Brahmani marble sculpture (Figure 12), originally belonging to Ranki Vav from London and mithuna couples belonging to Atru from USA is simply exemplary.
While the bodies of the two girls -- Satgwika and Mithuna -- have been recovered the body of the boy, Bhagwath Kumar, is yet to be traced.
On the panel above the entrance into the mandapa, mithuna couples lovingly embrace.
(16) Somsak Jiamthirasakul, 'Prawatsat wan chat thai chak 24 mithuna thueng 5 thanwa' [The history of Thai national day: From 24 June to 5 Dec], Fah thew kan 2, 2 (April-June 2004): 70-121.
Come on Team Oman!" added Mithuna Shetty, with Afzal Hussain chiming in with, "Congratulations Oman on winning in the semifinals and getting through to the final.
The children who lost their lives were identified as Sajna (5), Mithuna (5), Ramshana (6), Nandana (6), Anushree (8), Sneha (8), Santra (8), Sona (7) and Vaishnav.
The Upanishadic texts have even glorified sexual union, and the visual arts of classical India have embodied the vigour of mithuna (sexual union) and human body on the exterior portions of temples--[TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] deva mandiram--body is the abode of divinity.
Although these were built in the 10th century, the theme of sensual pleasure in the erotic mithuna figures has a sculptural ancestry of at least a thousand years, going back to before the onset of the Christian millennium (Watson 91).
The first, second and third day of 'Raja Parba' are called 'Pahili Rajo, 'Mithuna Sankranti', and Bhu Daaha' or 'Basi Raja', respectively.
The mithuna or loving couple, for instance, was an auspicious symbol on the gateways of religious shrines, but it was equally a powerful talisman.