mithridate

(redirected from Mithridates)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to Mithridates: Spartacus, Pontus

mithridate

(mĭth′rĭ-dāt′)
n.
An antidote against poison, especially a confection formerly held to be an antidote to all poisons.
References in periodicals archive ?
Sulla, after defeating Mithridates, returned to Italy and savaged the opposition army sent to intercept him.
standard bearers, captains, and prisoners from Mithridates's forces
In exchange for the help during this battle, Mithridates offered the Galatians land in Anatolia.
Here, within the ceremonial apadana, the court and people assemble to hear the double trial of Mithridates and Dionysius, although following on from that event Chariton takes us even further into the heart of the royal court and allows us, quite unexpectedly, to gaze into the forbidden space of the inner quarters of the royal palace itself.
At the same time, however, the first name recalls Jewish origin, while the second may be associated with some Asian kings, such as the king of Pontus and Asia Minor, Mithridates, a fierce enemy of the Roman Republic.
McGing, The Foreign Policy of Mithridates VI Eupator, King of Pontus (Leiden: Brill, 1986).
iskender'in olumunden sonra Mithridates Sinop'u ele gecirmic (Anonim, 1982), onun kurdugu Pontus Kralligi doneminde Sinop bolgesi parlak cagin merkezi olmuctur (Esemenli, 1990).
During the Hellenistic period ties intensified, even before Mithridates VI Eupator (r.
Like Mithridates, his toxic drafts in time prove a tonic against despair when taken in immunizing doses.
The Poison King: The Life and Legend of Mithridates, Rome's Deadliest Enemy.
The Kabbalah found a particularly receptive audience among Christian scholars, church leaders, and intellectuals, including Pico della Mirandola, Johannes Reuchlin, and Heinrich Cornelius Agrippa, as well as such Jewish converts to Christianity as della Mirandola's mentor, Flavius Mithridates, and Rabbi Abner de Burgos, who took the name of Alfonso de Valladolid.
A statue of Dionysus from 2nd-century Rome has the face of Alexander, so too, do busts of Mithridates and Achilles.