misdemeanor

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misdemeanor

A lesser crime than a felony, usually punishable by fines, imprisonment, penalty, or forfeiture.
References in periodicals archive ?
State Question 780 reclassified simple drug possession and many minor property crimes as misdemeanors rather than felonies.
Curtis that while a former version of a state law appeared to require that an indictment or presentment be filed in order to toll the two-year statute of limitations for misdemeanors, a citation is sufficient to toll the statute of limitations applicable to her DWI.
According to the Texas Election Code, only felony convictions require an elected official to resign, not misdemeanors.
MP Al-Tabtabaei faces charges in a case named "Al-Shamiah misdemeanors" and his colleague Al-Hashem in a case titled "Al-Sharq traffic misdemeanors." Emerging from the committee session, the chairman MP Al-Hmaidi Al-Sbaiee said the commission examined the realty law, bills on alternative penalties in misdemeanors, establishing the Jaafarite court and personal status department, indicating that the government requested that this issue be adjourned for further study.
Two bills to expand the collection of DNA from people convicted of certain misdemeanors are currently moving ahead in the General Assembly.
Martonick was then charged with "three counts each terroristic threats and reckless endangerment, all misdemeanors." He was also charged with "five misdemeanor counts of simple assault, three summary counts of harassment and one count each disorderly conduct, a misdemeanor, and public drunkenness."
Under the current guidelines, the sentence for a small-quantity possession case is probation for 18 months and up to 10 days in jail, no matter how many prior convictions for felonies or misdemeanors of any kind the defendant may have.
The classification of offenses as felonies or misdemeanors has long been a foundational aspect of the American criminal justice system.
This includes misdemeanor cases of all types, from simple battery to more serious misdemeanors such as sexual battery.
While Alaska amplifies the punishment for repeated misdemeanors with worthy intentions, it may be causing more harm than good.
INTRODUCTION: MISDEMEANORS IN THE AGE OF MASS INCARCERATION
But Alexandra Natapoff's new book Punishment Without Crime makes it clear that the young mom's plight is relatively typical for Americans, especially poor Americans, who have the misfortune to interact with the edifices of government that enforce laws against misdemeanors, traffic violations, and other supposedly "petty" offenses.