mirror neuron

(redirected from Mirror cells)
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mirror neuron

n.
A neuron found in the cerebral cortex that is active when one performs an action or when one witnesses another performing the same action, and whose function is thought to be involved in acquiring language and the ability to empathize.

mirror neuron

Any of a group of neurons that become active both when an animal moves in a certain way and when the animal observes others performing the same action. Learning by simulation or imitation is thought to be a function of the system of mirror neurons in the brain.
See also: neuron
References in periodicals archive ?
Fogassi's group built on the earlier work by examining how certain mirror cells respond to the intention behind the actions.
At the mirror-cell end, the threaded rod is fitted with a spherical ball-rod end, which mates to a pin in the outer circumference of the mirror cell's outer ring.
You can read about his double-plate mirror cell at his website, www.garyseronik.com.
Traditionally, mirror cells increase in complexity through a series that includes 3-, 9-, and 18-point supports.
Designing an effective mirror cell requires you to answer two basic questions: How many support points does your mirror need, and how should they be arranged?
For minimal cost and a weekend's effort, you will be rewarded with a mirror cell that is easy to collimate and lets your primary perform at its best.
Suspecting that the mirror supports might also be responsible, I disassembled the Orion and Bushnell mirror cells. Both proved to be holding the mirrors only at the edges.
With their light, well-ventilated mirror cells and oversize tubes, they were virtually free of tube currents.
Although the ability to optimize mirror cells was the primary reason for developing Plop, I expected that it would also verify the effectiveness of the standard cell designs.
My recent evaluation of mirror cells (S&T: September 1994, page 84) sparked a lot of interest, judging by the many letters I received.
The mirrors were mounted in place on three-point, bolt-and-spring mirror cells. Lock-down bolts on the cells proved essential, since a tiny movement in either mirror will completely ruin the alignment of the two telescopes.
The off-axis design is especially sensitive in this regard, so I used mirror cells that allow a wide range of adjustment.